Don't pay uk

Bristolboro

Active member
this campaign (dontpayuk) urges mass collective action, to refuse to pay ridiculous energy bills. It will only get worse if people don't protest because we know that government and oil companies don't care who suffers as long as they sustain their power or profits. Millions refusing to pay could cause a seismic shift in the industry.

What do people think?
 

Funky_Chicken

Well-known member
I think it’s an excellent idea - millions delaying their payments for a few months would have a big effect. It would take millions though to make it work
 

kuepper

Well-known member
like the campaign not to pay the poll tax you'll have to pay in the end and maybe end up incurring bailiff charges and CCJ costs on top
 

Bristolboro

Active member
is it morally wrong to refuse to pay when the system is unfair? All we do is pay the profits. The only choices are not to consume or not to pay.
 

Randy

Well-known member
this campaign (dontpayuk) urges mass collective action, to refuse to pay ridiculous energy bills. It will only get worse if people don't protest because we know that government and oil companies don't care who suffers as long as they sustain their power or profits. Millions refusing to pay could cause a seismic shift in the industry.

What do people think?
A great idea.

It'll take lots of people to work.

Its going to get to the point where people simply won't care about the potential effects of bailiff and courts interventions.

I would fully support any action like this going forward.
 

S7DiscoDown

Well-known member
Don't think I've got the minerals. I pay everything on time.

I mean my biggest gripe for years is the TV licence. I don't watch anything on BBC / I player or podcasts etc. Yet still pay it for fear of 'getting into trouble' 😂. Just seems less hassle.
 

Steer

Well-known member
A great idea.

It'll take lots of people to work.

Its going to get to the point where people simply won't care about the potential effects of bailiff and courts interventions.

I would fully support any action like this going forward.
People will not care about baliffs takign away their possessions, and ther vehicles?
 

r00fie1

Well-known member
Two significant Statistics:

1.

UK households £1 billion in energy bill debt arrears

Author: Jon McNamara

When totaling the amount of energy bill debt owed by all households across the UK, the total stands at just under £1 billion. There are well over 2 million accounts that are in arrears, and money is owed for both electric and gas bills.

The problem is getting much worse. The report from Ofgem indicates that the number of utility accounts that are in arrears has increased about 15 to 20 per cent year over year. This is even occurring as some of the energy suppliers have reduced their rates due to falling oil prices and the rate is also increasing as the economy is strengthening.

The customers that are in energy bill debt arrears also owe a significant amount to their suppliers. When looking just at electricity, the average arrears on an account is over £350 and almost £400 is owed for electricity. This has lead to an increase usage of pre-payment meters according to a study done by Ofgem.



2.


UK Big Six energy firms made more than £1bn in profit ahead of price hike

Adam Bychawski Feb 2022

The UK’s Big Six energy companies raked in more than a billion pounds of profit ahead of this year’s record hike in bills.

The highest earner, SSE, made £600m alone in profit before taxes, according to annual accounts published by the energy regulator Ofgem. Last month, the Scottish energy company was forced to apologise for advising customers to “do star jumps” to keep their energy bills down.

Scottish Power and Centrica, which owns British Gas, made a further £423m before tax between them. EDF Energy and E.ON recorded losses of £154m and £198m respectively.

The figures are the most recent available, and cover either 2020 or the 2020/21 financial year.

Energy bills are set to soar in April after Ofgem announced it would increase the maximum rate suppliers could charge by 53%. It said the rise reflected the fourfold increase in energy market prices over the past year.

Households on an average dual-fuel energy tariff will face a rise of £693 a year. But the poorest, who are more likely to use pre-paid meters, will be hit with a steeper hike of £708 a year. Some low-income customers are unable to move from meters to automatic payments – on which suppliers offer discounts – because they require credit checks.

Britain is already in the grip of a cost of living crisis. In December, inflation jumped to 5.4%, its highest level in almost 30 years. All areas of daily life, including food and clothing, have seen prices rise since 2020, with transport costs alone rising as much as 12%.

Poorer households will be worst affected by the squeeze. As a proportion of their income, the lowest-income families spend twice as much on food and housing bills as the richest, according to research by the Resolution Foundation.
 

uncle_rico

Well-known member
Don't think I've got the minerals. I pay everything on time.

I mean my biggest gripe for years is the TV licence. I don't watch anything on BBC / I player or podcasts etc. Yet still pay it for fear of 'getting into trouble' 😂. Just seems less hassle.
Just tell them you don’t watch any BBC channels or and of their online content. It’s easy to do. They sent someone round to check, but it was about a year or so later. We only really watch Netflix and I only watch live sport via virgin and never watch terrestrial tv. The licence will be abolished in the near future anyway.
 

afcb_acklam

Well-known member
Just tell them you don’t watch any BBC channels or and of their online content. It’s easy to do. They sent someone round to check, but it was about a year or so later. We only really watch Netflix and I only watch live sport via virgin and never watch terrestrial tv. The licence will be abolished in the near future anyway.

can i ask, what did the check involve exactly?!
 

JackG

Well-known member
Just tell them you don’t watch any BBC channels or and of their online content. It’s easy to do. They sent someone round to check, but it was about a year or so later. We only really watch Netflix and I only watch live sport via virgin and never watch terrestrial tv. The licence will be abolished in the near future anyway.
If you watch live sport via Virgin then, legally, you are required to have a licence.
 

Nero

Well-known member
The final straw that broke the camel's back,
They took away the welfare then gave me the sack.
Well I've seen the rules that you call fair,
When it's profit, you keep it; but debt, we share.
The cycle of fear goes around forever,
The very idea that we're in this together.
 
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Randy

Well-known member
People will not care about baliffs takign away their possessions, and ther vehicles?
One.
If millions take part in this there aren't enough bailiffs and court staff in the country to process the amount of warrants and repossession notices or take goods away. Look at the current backlog in the courts system caused by covid closures for example.
Two.
A household on the bare bones of its **** won't have bailiffs in the forefront of their minds when they are struggling to keep the lights on and their kids warm.
Three.
The country will probably arrive at violent riots before any of the above came to fruition anyways.
 

Randy

Well-known member
Caused by austerity more like. Courts and Criminal Justice was already in a shocking state before COVID.
That aswell I forgot to mention. It started getting bad over a decade ago. When I was a bailiff towards the end of my time doing it we were looking at 9 month waits for warrants to enter properties in some areas.
 

Nero

Well-known member
That aswell I forgot to mention. It started getting bad over a decade ago. When I was a bailiff towards the end of my time doing it we were looking at 9 month waits for warrants to enter properties in some areas.
That's incredible isn't it and just shows how bad aspects of this country has become under the Tories in just 12 years.
 
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