When’s the second wave?

RandySavage

Well-known member
#61
I'm absolutely sure that they understand the reason for it, unlike you.
I tend to agree with strategies like those used in Sweden and Belarus. Strategies that won't cause more deaths than the virus. Strategies that won't put millions out of work and straight into poverty. Strategies that don't put kid's futures at risk due to lack of education provision.
I understand some people don't care about any of that though.

😉😏
 

bear66

Well-known member
#62
I tend to agree with strategies like those used in Sweden and Belarus. Strategies that won't cause more deaths than the virus. Strategies that won't put millions out of work and straight into poverty. Strategies that don't put kid's futures at risk due to lack of education provision.
I understand some people don't care about any of that though.

😉😏
You must have been too young to have lived through the smallpox lockdown in the UK in the 60s. Some of us who did know that society is a good thing when people take good care of each other.

I feel very sad about those grieving because of lost loved ones and those who have 'recovered' with limbs amputated or major heart, lung and kidney damage. I'll do my bit for my fellow human beings and thankfully the majority of people will as well.

At least Sweden are now having an inquiry to ensure they change for the better.
 

RandySavage

Well-known member
#63
You must have been too young to have lived through the smallpox lockdown in the UK in the 60s. Some of us who did know that society is a good thing when people take good care of each other.

I feel very sad about those grieving because of lost loved ones and those who have 'recovered' with limbs amputated or major heart, lung and kidney damage. I'll do my bit for my fellow human beings and thankfully the majority of people will as well.

At least Sweden are now having an inquiry to ensure they change for the better.
Ah so you are fine with all the points I listed then?
Which makes sense if you are on the older side of the hill and won't have to live with the consequences of this massive overreaction for the next 50+ years. It's all good though for you though if you've got a pension coming in or are close to retirement age.
Nevermind us 'young' folk who will either be A) out of a job, existing day to day surviving off of state aid or B) paying so much tax that there won't be a much of a difference in living standards between those who flog their arses off for 60 hours a week and those from point A.

You don't agree with lifting of lockdowns and countries that haven't locked down whereas I don't agree with lockdowns and will continue not to believe in them, simple as that.
 

coluka

Well-known member
#66
Ah so you are fine with all the points I listed then?
Which makes sense if you are on the older side of the hill and won't have to live with the consequences of this massive overreaction for the next 50+ years. It's all good though for you though if you've got a pension coming in or are close to retirement age.
Nevermind us 'young' folk who will either be A) out of a job, existing day to day surviving off of state aid or B) paying so much tax that there won't be a much of a difference in living standards between those who flog their arses off for 60 hours a week and those from point A.

You don't agree with lifting of lockdowns and countries that haven't locked down whereas I don't agree with lockdowns and will continue not to believe in them l, simple as that.
There are a few of us older ones that have lived through dark times too mate, paying off debts incurred by generations before or due to difficult economic times though, whilst struggling at times to keep roofs over the heads of our kids, some taking 2 jobs if they could, many not having a job at all, no foodbanks to help out worring just to how to make ends meet, 15% interest rates on mortgages, 3 day weeks. It aint a new phenomenon for your generation, just different causes, poo happens, and it always will. When you reach 55+ you may even have a different outlook from now and compared to the generations yet to come.
 
#69
It appears that there are two different ways of locking down which then have two differing outcomes.
You can either lockdown hard, fast and strictly. This then brings the R rate down well below 1 before going for a phased opening which should keep the rate of infection low and the death count low.
Or you go for a less strict lockdown and start opening up quickly when the R is just below one. Add to that you are allowed to travel across the country and even out of the country. This will result in a lowering of the rate of infection, but will always be higher than the first option. This also maintains a higher tail to the death rate, particularly when there are issues in measuring the death rate. This longer tail will result in a lack of confidence that things are getting better and the economy will suffer longer as a result.
In my opinion England has taken the second option and will continue to suffer from this for a long time. Wales, Ireland and Scotland have taken a stricter version and their death rates are significantly lower.
Most parts of Europe appear to have taken the first option, however they will suffer outbreaks particularly opening up to tourism.
How it effects people depends which part of the population you belong too. The younger you are, yes if you catch it you will most likely recover, however there are after effects as bourn out by my daughter. The older you are, the more likely you may have major problems and why would you take the risk. I think the very oldest are very pragmatic and are happy to take a risk as all they want to do is see their families.
There is no solution that pleases everyone, as everyone is different. They best think any of us can do is act with kindness, understanding and with care not to do anything that will affect anyone else. So, wash your hands, wear a mask, keep your distance don't drink too much in the pub, but go out and spend your money, enjoy life and support the Boro!
 

dooderooni

Well-known member
#70
Randy, not sure how old you are, but as col says, us older folk have lived through recessions, high unemployment and a lot more too.
Given our population profile I think you need to realise that an approach like Sweden could well have resulted in far more deaths than we have suffered just as much as it might have resulted in less. There is no one right way and we have to accept the lot we've been dealt by a government who tried for herd immunity first. Unfortunately we don't get a do-over.
 

Billy Horner

Well-known member
#75
Covid.
Given VE Day and blm protests were over a month ago. Lockdown has pretty much ended for many and cases, hospital admissions and deaths continue to fall then why no second wave
We’ve massively over recorded anyway but seems odd to me that it’s still on the decline.
Is it seasonal?
Have we built immunity?
I was dubious to start with but now I’m really starting to doubt what we are being told.
The 7-day average for new infections has now increased for 9 out of the past 12 days. It is currently 16.8% higher than it was a fortnight ago, albeit at a much lower level than it was at the peak in April.

I would say that we're doing an excellent job of seeding a second wave by enabling the virus to continue circulating in the background during the summer. I don't blame the lifting of lockdown measures for this, rather the inability of the government to implement a comprehensive test, trace and isolate system.

Let's see what happens when cold and flu season arrives in the late autumn...
 

bear66

Well-known member
#77
I can't remember this smallpox epidemic in the 60s?!
South Wales. Brought in by a traveller from Pakistan. 25 cases of which 6 people died. We had all sports matches cancelled, all entertainment closed down, schools closed. The whole area became a 'ghost town'.
 
#78
The 7-day average for new infections has now increased for 9 out of the past 12 days. It is currently 16.8% higher than it was a fortnight ago, albeit at a much lower level than it was at the peak in April.

I would say that we're doing an excellent job of seeding a second wave by enabling the virus to continue circulating in the background during the summer. I don't blame the lifting of lockdown measures for this, rather the inability of the government to implement a comprehensive test, trace and isolate system.

Let's see what happens when cold and flu season arrives in the late autumn...
Is the number of cases going up a problem when the amount of testing is going up faster and the amount of %positive is staying stable ?
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