Vaccine passports or lateral test for Wembley games

Funky_Chicken

Well-known member
Except fully vaccinated people can still carry and pass on the virus. Or has that changed now?
No it hasn’t changed, but as smalltowns reply inferred, it’s given people the impression that they are somehow safe after they’ve been injected - that is very much down to a successful media brainwashing campaign




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SmallTown

Well-known member
No it hasn’t changed, but as smalltowns reply inferred, it’s given people the impression that they are somehow safe after they’ve been injected - that is very much down to a successful media brainwashing campaign




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No it’s very much down to the science proving it’s less likely to pass on the disease and significantly less likely to lead to serious instances of the disease. It’s almost like you’re only seeing what you want to see and ignoring the rest
 

Funky_Chicken

Well-known member
No it’s very much down to the science proving it’s less likely to pass on the disease and significantly less likely to lead to serious instances of the disease. It’s almost like you’re only seeing what you want to see and ignoring the rest
Thank you - you’ve literally just reiterated my point 👍🏻




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Randy

Well-known member
You didn’t read my other post then
So does the vaccine prevent transmission or not? Because if it doesn't then the whole concept of a vaccine passport is redundant.

Also on the subject of testing, of anybody has a testing kit made my these guys I'd get rid at once.

 

SmallTown

Well-known member
So does the vaccine prevent transmission or not? Because if it doesn't then the whole concept of a vaccine passport is redundant.

Also on the subject of testing, of anybody has a testing kit made my these guys I'd get rid at once.

I've tried, so patiently and so hard to explain to you that these things don't have a yes or no answer. Tried so very hard to explain that in the real world there are percentages and ways of reducing things without stopping them. I don't know why you're struggling to grasp the "50% reduction in transmission" I really don't think you're that stupid that you don't get risks and percentages but I'm getting less convinced the more you ignore them
 

Funky_Chicken

Well-known member
So does the vaccine prevent transmission or not? Because if it doesn't then the whole concept of a vaccine passport is redundant.

Also on the subject of testing, of anybody has a testing kit made my these guys I'd get rid at once.

The answer is no it does not prevent transmission




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Funky_Chicken

Well-known member
What is the actual use of these vaccine passports then ? You’ve admitted vaccines don’t stop transmission so come on what are they for ?



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Randy

Well-known member
I've tried, so patiently and so hard to explain to you that these things don't have a yes or no answer. Tried so very hard to explain that in the real world there are percentages and ways of reducing things without stopping them. I don't know why you're struggling to grasp the "50% reduction in transmission" I really don't think you're that stupid that you don't get risks and percentages but I'm getting less convinced the more you ignore them
So if it doesn't completely stop transmission what's the point in passports proving you are vaccinated? You say up to 50% reduction? It's really quite simple, just stick with the 30 minute lateral flow test before an event if preventative measures are required. Not three days or two days or one day before, the same day immediately before entry to whatever stadium/bank/hospital/supermarket. Job done.
 

bear66

Well-known member
So if it doesn't completely stop transmission what's the point in passports proving you are vaccinated? You say up to 50% reduction? It's really quite simple, just stick with the 30 minute lateral flow test before an event if preventative measures are required. Not three days or two days or one day before, the same day immediately before entry to whatever stadium/bank/hospital/supermarket. Job done.
A person who has been fully vaccinated is significantly less likely to transmit the virus than someone with a negative lateral flow test result.
 

Funky_Chicken

Well-known member
A person who has been fully vaccinated is significantly less likely to transmit the virus than someone with a negative lateral flow test result.
No one is disputing that - the question was can they still transmit and the answer is yes, so once again what is the purpose of a vaccine passport?




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So if it doesn't completely stop transmission what's the point in passports proving you are vaccinated? You say up to 50% reduction? It's really quite simple, just stick with the 30 minute lateral flow test before an event if preventative measures are required. Not three days or two days or one day before, the same day immediately before entry to whatever stadium/bank/hospital/supermarket. Job done.
Even that is not 100% and as Funky says if its not 100% what's the point?
 

Randy

Well-known member
A person who has been fully vaccinated is significantly less likely to transmit the virus than someone with a negative lateral flow test result.
So we aren't ever seeing full stadiums again then? Because even with vaccines and/or lateral flow test they are reduced capacity. I hope football clubs have budgeted for this accordingly.
 
seriously?

ok here’s one: a seatbelt doesn’t 100% save you from dying in a car crash. So why wear one?
No not seriously

I think anything that reduces the risk of transmission is worthwhile. I'm fascinated by Funky & Randy insisting that vaccines must be 100% effective in preventing transmission but have no problem with testing being imperfect.
 
So we aren't ever seeing full stadiums again then? Because even with vaccines and/or lateral flow test they are reduced capacity. I hope football clubs have budgeted for this accordingly.
just because we don't have any means to prove a person has zero risk of being infectious is not a reason to not ultimately return to full stadiums. We just have to assess the risk of transmission as being sufficiently low. Of course deciding what counts as sufficiently low is difficult to agree on, but that has to be the objective.

Part of assessing that risk will be seeing what happens in partially full grounds and of course circumstances will change over time. In 6 months the incidence of covid in the population may be much lower than in July. combined with high vaccination rates that may be enough to assess the risk of transmission within a football ground as being sufficiently low to allow a capacity crowd.

I'm not convinced that passports have a role but they're certainly more convenient than expecting tens of thousands of people to take a test whilst they're stood outside a stadium.
 
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