Still being ripped off…

bigbob

Well-known member
You'd be dead by lunchtime on that where I live. Families carry stuff, and usually lots of it, particularly when kids are young.
I am not arguing that cars shouldn't exist. Obviously if you commute a distance or if your work depends upon it or if you have a family etc etc then use a car, hopefully EV or an ICE car that's suitable for the purpose. But where possible use public transport or a bike or walk. So many people jump in the car to save time, what do they do with the time that they 'save'. Watch telly, go on fmttm etc. When I was a kid, it was only once a blue moon that I got to go in my dads car (mam didn't drive), ie going on holiday or the occasional day out. School, shopping, match etc, you made your own way there, ie walked or bus. Now everyone has a god given right to be transported from A to B saving as much time and energy as possible. People are getting fatter, the world is dying, its not rocket science.
 

Randy

Well-known member
I would add people who can't ride bicyles or walk easily.

I often read why don't people cycle 10 miles a day or walk 2 miles to work and shopping etc - its assumed everyone is aged 18-55 and reasonable fit and can buy a small bag of shopping every day, also have a spare 60 minutes every day to do this. I know many people could do more, but there are limitations.

My mum in her mid 20s used to cycle to ICI Wilton from Ormesby, she was physically fit and strong at the time, but she found it tough five days a week in snow, ice, rain, gusts and when pregnant with me! It was tough and there was much less traffic then.
Yep.
As the population continues to grow older and live longer, a car is a vital piece of machinery to help keep them connected to the outside world.
 

MolteniArcore

Well-known member
Yep.
As the population continues to grow older and live longer, a car is a vital piece of machinery to help keep them connected to the outside world.

I don't think anyone wanting more cycling & walking for short journeys doesn't get this point.

If able bodied people ditched the cars on short trips it would leave the roads clear for people who actually need to use them. It would save disabled / elderly people being stuck in traffic and causing pollution. They wouldn't struggle to park. They would get their stuff done quicker.

Reducing cars and having more walking / cycling is a win win.
 

Randy

Well-known member
I don't think anyone wanting more cycling & walking for short journeys doesn't get this point.

If able bodied people ditched the cars on short trips it would leave the roads clear for people who actually need to use them. It would save disabled / elderly people being stuck in traffic and causing pollution. They wouldn't struggle to park. They would get their stuff done quicker.

Reducing cars and having more walking / cycling is a win win.
I cycle to work and back every day now. One end of the village to the other. Would I do that if I worked in Stokesley or Guisborough? Probably not as the roads are unsafe and public transport links poor. Would also increase the commute time.
 

1finny

Well-known member
1finny

The garage below is family owned and they are selling unleaded for 157.9p at present.

Its not a loaded or critical question - but how are they able to do it?


Must admit, I’ve no idea on that one.
I couldn’t get near it without losing my shirt

I’m assuming they are VAT registered? That’s the only thing I can think of other than they are being good citizens.
 

Pinkers

Active member
I am not arguing that cars shouldn't exist. Obviously if you commute a distance or if your work depends upon it or if you have a family etc etc then use a car, hopefully EV or an ICE car that's suitable for the purpose. But where possible use public transport or a bike or walk. So many people jump in the car to save time, what do they do with the time that they 'save'. Watch telly, go on fmttm etc. When I was a kid, it was only once a blue moon that I got to go in my dads car (mam didn't drive), ie going on holiday or the occasional day out. School, shopping, match etc, you made your own way there, ie walked or bus. Now everyone has a god given right to be transported from A to B saving as much time and energy as possible. People are getting fatter, the world is dying, its not rocket science.
Some good points, people probably did drive less back in the day. I always walk when and will try to do it for a longer trip (e.g. in and out of my local town/city) if the weather is decent. It's definitely win-win if and when people can not use the car, but I'm not sure how practical that is for most people in today's world. I wouldn't dare ride a bike where I live, too dangerous and doubly so for kids. But it's also the time and weather aspects in the UK. If you're going to work for instance you need a shower when you arrive etc, and in winter you've got riding in the dark to deal with, and it all adds to the time and effort. I take your point though that some people's circumstances allow them to do it.
 

MolteniArcore

Well-known member
as the roads are unsafe and public transport links poor. Would also increase the commute time.

Exactly the problem. If the infrastructure was better people might not mind a longer commute. Lots of people go to the run / cycle in their own time after work but you could combine that with a commute and actually have more time to yourself. If the infrastructure was better of course.
 

SmallTown

Well-known member
The single reason the netherlands is so cycle friendly is because it is completely and utterly flat

And why should the country devolve back to the 1800's purely because theres too much tax and profit on fossil fuels, its a ridiculous argument
I don't think it is. I cycle to work. It's healthier for me and better for the environment. I can't see why cities can't be cycle friendly. Most people work within 10 miles of their homes
 

MolteniArcore

Well-known member
I don't think it is. I cycle to work. It's healthier for me and better for the environment. I can't see why cities can't be cycle friendly. Most people work within 10 miles of their homes

Governments don't like upsetting drivers. Apart from fuel duty but we are conditioned to accept that now. Car is king.
 

1finny

Well-known member
Governments don't like upsetting drivers. Apart from fuel duty but we are conditioned to accept that now. Car is king.
The new Minister for Transport (my local MP Karl McCartney) has already been applauded for ‘taking the side of the motorist’

Not surprisingly he’s another crook who takes bungs and a right cnut by the way
 

Zoophonic

Well-known member
The single reason the netherlands is so cycle friendly is because it is completely and utterly flat
Holland is cycling friendly yes and they built the infrastructure to make it a pleasant experience too. Manchester and London are making every effort to improve the cycle highways in their Cities with some success. And Netherlands isn’t “utterly flat”. You need to cycle around the South Limburg south east corner of Holland to understand it isnt.
 

MolteniArcore

Well-known member
There are places in the UK that you can ride 50 miles and don't climb a total of 100ft - No infrastructure though so cycling isn't booming there.

The 'Netherlands is flat' argument is a lazy one.
 

SmallTown

Well-known member
Holland is cycling friendly yes and they built the infrastructure to make it a pleasant experience too. Manchester and London are making every effort to improve the cycle highways in their Cities with some success. And Netherlands isn’t “utterly flat”. You need to cycle around the South Limburg south east corner of Holland to understand it isnt.
Good point. I've cycled round there in the past. It's isn't flat. And that is such a lazy argument. It's basically making excuses for our country not investing
 

Gunslinger

Well-known member
The single reason why the Netherlands is so cycle friendly is because of proper infrastructure.

E-bikes negate hills.

The country should evolve. That means waking up to the effect short car journeys (80% are under 5 miles) damage health and the environment. A bonus of realising this is that it is cheaper and we have less fat knackers. There is no downside to having less cars on the road.
Yes, and that infastructure is made so much easier by the fact it is an entirley flat country

E-bikes use fossil fuels
I don't think it is. I cycle to work. It's healthier for me and better for the environment. I can't see why cities can't be cycle friendly. Most people work within 10 miles of their homes
So you can cycle to work

Good for you, but it is a ridiculous assumption to assert that because you can , everybody else can , does everybody else in the world work in the same location relative to where they live as you?
 

bigbob

Well-known member
Exactly the problem. If the infrastructure was better people might not mind a longer commute. Lots of people go to the run / cycle in their own time after work but you could combine that with a commute and actually have more time to yourself. If the infrastructure was better of course.
Sorry but don't think this is true. I live in Ingleby and the infrastructure there for biking is quite good. Plenty of people/families out on the bikes for leisure. But I don't think people now associate walking/biking with anything else but leisure. When I bike down to Tescos to do a bit of shopping the car park is rammed, the bike racks are empty. Accept that you are not going to get your big shop with a bike but one tescos bag will fit into a haversack on your back. Probably 50% of the footfall is just for a single bag. OK - not good for old people etc but a large majority could do this in ingleby but don't. Its just not the done thing but the infrastructure is there.
 

MolteniArcore

Well-known member
Sorry but don't think this is true. I live in Ingleby and the infrastructure there for biking is quite good. Plenty of people/families out on the bikes for leisure. But I don't think people now associate walking/biking with anything else but leisure. When I bike down to Tescos to do a bit of shopping the car park is rammed, the bike racks are empty. Accept that you are not going to get your big shop with a bike but one tescos bag will fit into a haversack on your back. Probably 50% of the footfall is just for a single bag. OK - not good for old people etc but a large majority could do this in ingleby but don't. Its just not the done thing but the infrastructure is there.

Like I said a few posts ago, in the UK the car is king. We need a culture change too, I grant you that certainly.

Until the media stop with the cyclist hate and it’s more of an accepted part of life we won’t change.

Infrastructure would help with that though. When you make it hard to drive into towns / cities the uptake will be better but for now we are stuck making everything easy for cars and harder for pedestrians / cyclists.
 

MolteniArcore

Well-known member
Yes, and that infastructure is made so much easier by the fact it is an entirley flat country

E-bikes use fossil fuels

So you can cycle to work

Good for you, but it is a ridiculous assumption to assert that because you can , everybody else can , does everybody else in the world work in the same location relative to where they live as you?

Give over man, Jesus.
 

SmallTown

Well-known member
Yes, and that infastructure is made so much easier by the fact it is an entirley flat country

E-bikes use fossil fuels

So you can cycle to work

Good for you, but it is a ridiculous assumption to assert that because you can , everybody else can , does everybody else in the world work in the same location relative to where they live as you?
It isn't an entirely flat country.

And I didn't say everyone could cycle to work
 
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