Clap for Heroes

the_holgate_roof

Well-known member
I read about this last Thursday morning and meant to go and do it but forgot all about it by the time it got to 8pm, did anyone do it? Was it very well observed or like most other COVID related things, have people relaxed into the pandemic now???
 

Mr_Fridge

Active member
I went out for a run at 7:55. Saw one man walking his dog. Didn’t look like he was banging saucepans together.
 

S7DiscoDown

Well-known member
Not one person around me. I should also stress that my next door neighbour was a nurse for 24 years.

I'm all for rewarding 'heroes' but not Overy convinced clapping helps😕
 

afcb_acklam

Active member
I think a pay rise in recognition is needed.
Done with clapping.
Its a pizz take.

for me, a pay rise is not the answer. surely it would be better for all to have more "heroes", so they dont have to kill themselves doing stupid hours, and can achieve a better work life balance?
 

r00fie1

Well-known member
for me, a pay rise is not the answer. surely it would be better for all to have more "heroes", so they dont have to kill themselves doing stupid hours, and can achieve a better work life balance?
They need a pay rise and we need Nursing to take back control of Nurse Training. We need to take away Priti Patels barriers to qualified Clinical Practitioners from outside the UK and kick out the private leaches sucking public money out of our health service.

The pool of clinical staff is empty. There is no "spare" - not even on "the bank". We`ve let politicians balls the training and recruitment up - 41,000 vacancies for qualified Nursing staff unfilled. We dont get heroes unless we pay them and train them.
Theres at least another 35,000 vacancies at anyone time - as a rule of thumb.
Believe me.
 
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r00fie1

Well-known member
If anyone wants to see the up to date figures by sector / profession / clinical specialism / demographic distribution / vacancies - Here it is.

A long detailed depressingly accurate read - even I am not going to paste it all - so if you want a glance, just click and see. Good luck.


The NHS workforce in numbers

Facts on staffing and staff shortages in England.

Explainer


Published: 08/05/2019

Updated: 29/02/20

Author
Lucina Rolewicz

Author

Billy Palmer


 

BiggEggo

Active member
They need a pay rise and we need Nursing to take back control of Nurse Training. We need to take away Priti Patels barriers to qualified Clinical Practitioners from outside the UK and kick out the private leaches sucking public money out of our health service.

The pool of clinical staff is empty. There is no "spare" - not even on "the bank". We`ve let politicians balls the training and recruitment up - 41,000 vacancies for qualified Nursing staff unfilled. We dont get heroes unless we pay them and train them.
Theres at least another 35,000 vacancies at anyone time - as a rule of thumb.
Believe me.
Pay them and train them?
Quicker and cheaper to let immigrants in to fill these roles. That's how this government will roll.
 

Blf

Well-known member
When I trained you got paid by the hospital you worked in. It meant that I had enough money to be able to get by after dropping from an electricians wage. I was in the last group to get paid that way as bursaries came next followed by student loans.
I could not of trained under those circumstances as I had to support my family. I was a mature student aged 31 when I trained. I was one of 6 mature students in a group of 10. Within 5 years the amount of mature students coming through dropped a lot. All that life experience which helped me alongside the training was lost as older people wanting to train couldnt get by on £270 a month then having to take out loans to train. For recruitment it was a disaster.
 

r00fie1

Well-known member
Pay them and train them?
Quicker and cheaper to let immigrants in to fill these roles. That's how this government will roll.
No.
We hadnt been able to turn on the magic tap from abroad right up untill the start of this year.
That never was and never will be the answer.
There is no other solution but pay to train clinical staff and provide a decent wage.
 
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London_Boro

Well-known member
First time round when people were more emotional about the pandemic and the work the NHS were doing, our street were out in force. This time, although we all owe a massive debt of gratitude to the NHS and are thankful every day for the work they do, nobody was out clapping.

I think we all feel that they now need the support from the government and a fair days pay for their heroics which currently those on the frontline do not get. The hard workers from NHS know how we feel about them now without the need to clap every Thursday.
 

go-nads!

Well-known member
Student nurses are the backbone of the NHS, it would be impossible to function without them.

Having supported a partner through nurse and midwifery training I’m aware of the huge stress studying, working and assignments is. It is impossible now for more mature students to access the provision.

Taking away the bursary showed the level of disdain the government has for the profession.

It was made very clear in the run up to the last election that the Tory’s had no respect for the NHS. It was clear that Labour were fighting for the NHS, our doctors, nurses and other health professionals. Yet many still voted for the Conservatives.

I didn’t stand on my doorstep clapping for our hero’s because to be honest I felt ashamed of such a sham and hypocritical statement.

If we were proud of our NHS Hero’s as a nation, we should never have let these b@stards the continued opportunity not only to destroy it, but line their own pockets whilst doing so.
 

festa5

Well-known member
It'll make more of a difference not to vote Tory in 4 years time.

I had mixed feelings about the clapping first time round. All for recognising everything those on the frontline have done and continue to do. But the sight of government ministers doing it just p****d me off, unbelievable hypocrisy.

I think it'd make more of a statement to have Johnson and his cronies have to do the walk of shame from game of thrones every Thursday at 8pm.

Suspect that'd do far more to lift the spirits of nhs staff at this time. I'd definitely get involved with that, assuming you can still buy rotten fruit post brexit.
 
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Corcaigh_the_Cat

Well-known member
When I was in training we did a 6 week block in school, followed by 8 weeks medical ward, 8 weeks surgical ward then back to school for a fortnight before going on to Orthopaedics, theatre etc and so on. We had study and assignments whilst working but nothing over the top. It was SRN training pre degree days.

When we worked our 8 weeks we were the bigger number on the ward, with a sister, one or two SRNs and maybe an SEN and an auxiliary.

Auxiliaries (health care assistants) seem to now make up the bigger number. Is that the case?
 

r00fie1

Well-known member
When I was in training we did a 6 week block in school, followed by 8 weeks medical ward, 8 weeks surgical ward then back to school for a fortnight before going on to Orthopaedics, theatre etc and so on. We had study and assignments whilst working but nothing over the top. It was SRN training pre degree days.

When we worked our 8 weeks we were the bigger number on the ward, with a sister, one or two SRNs and maybe an SEN and an auxiliary.

Auxiliaries (health care assistants) seem to now make up the bigger number. Is that the case?
Band 3s+4s are now taking on some of the responsibilities of new band 5s on the wards and they in turn are ending up doing the job of a very experenced 5 or band 6 nurse. Ive seen a Band 5 + bank staff left to supervise 3 n.a`s in a 4- bayed ward with 6 patients in each.
Most experienced - older - staff - have either retired or left wards / ICU / ACU for other jobs, or left the service altogether.
Its a wonder there is anyone left - especially with the abuse and lack of empathy from Management and some patients and their families.
You will only take a kicking at work everyday for so long - then staff just say SOD IT!
 
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