There is talk on various platforms about civil disobedience..............

h_m_boro

Well-known member
Everything has a massive knock on effect. People pay the gas/electric, can't afford to pay for food. Stop donating to food banks. People starve. Cut back on everything -ie don't spend what they haven't got - the economy suffers. Economy starts to suffer, people lose their jobs. People lose jobs, have nothing to lose, get desperate, turn to crime. It's a vortex, where does it end?
A spark. Just needs one spark..........
The government are there to govern/look after the people, and this lot have clearly shown they are happy to let thousands die/suffer to keep big business in profit.
Absolute pack of b*stards, all of them.
 

American_Mary

Well-known member
We are vassal's of big business and this current crisis could and should have been averted by sensible governance, with current output the UK could meet 53% of our gas needs with investment in untapped fields off the coast of Northern Ireland, Western Scotland, the Irish Sea and North Sea we could get up to around 70% self sufficiency for Gas, with other sources such as wind, wave, hydro, and solar we could be 100% self reliant for energy, this is not an isolationist policy but a genuine way in which the country could have more control on and influence on energy prices.

We should have Nationalised companies across all sectors competing against private companies and giving people the opportunity to back the State with their business, we have allowed big companies too much power and control and the tail is wagging the dog, the government are not interested in problem solving but in managing the situation to what suits them best, they could have subsidised energy prices, imposed a windfall tax, reduced VAT, had the foresight to have a contingency plan in place, it baffles me that a country that boosted of how little it relied on Russian energy imports is being impacted more than any other, this can only be down to bad governance and the failure of Johnson, Sunak, Kwarteng and co to do their job's properly.

These are the top 5 Worldwide Electricity price increases:
  1. UK - 129.1 percent increase
  2. Czech Republic - 121.6 percent increase
  3. Netherlands - 108.5 percent increase
  4. Italy - 94.7 percent increase
  5. Belgium - 84.3 percent increase
And these are the Top 5 Worldwide Gas price increases:
  1. Belgium - 234.1 percent increase
  2. Bulgaria - 224 percent increase
  3. Germany - 218 percent increase
  4. UK - 209.1 percent increase
  5. Austria - 207.3 percent increase
As you can see only us and Belgium are both in the Top 5 and countries with a much greater reliance on Russian energy imports are managing to keep prices lower than ours through proper support and sensible leadership.

We need to do something, I just think that mass protestation and direct action will be counterproductive and lead to further impositions on our rights, co-ordinated action is needed but it has to be peaceful, effective and not allow the Government to twist the narrative to suit, what that is I'm not sure, but there must be something that is directly focused on those who can enforce change which usually means hitting them in the pocket.
 
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BillyBoyStu

Active member
This bloke thinks it wont be a problem soon.
https://www.telegraph.co.uk/busines...ave-glut-cheap-power-world-leading-batteries/

"Britain will soon have a glut of cheap power, and world-leading batteries to store it." Ambrose Evans-Pritchard's article from 28 July is gushing with a positive but realistic assessment of the amazing leaps we're making in renewables in the UK.

Today’s electricity price shock is the last crisis of the old order. Britain will soon have far more power at times of peak production than it can absorb. The logistical headache will be abundance.

Wind and solar provided almost 60% of the UK’s power for substantial stretches last weekend, briefly peaking at 66%. This is not to make a propaganda point about green energy, although this home-made power is self-evidently displacing liquefied natural gas (LNG) imported right now at nosebleed prices.

It is a point about the mathematical implications of the UK’s gargantuan push for renewables. Offshore wind capacity is going to increase from 11 to 50 gigawatts (GW) by 2030 under the Government’s latest fast-track plans.

RenewableUK says this country currently has a total of 86GW in the project pipeline. This the most ambitious rollout of offshore wind in the world, ahead of China at 78GW, and the US at 48GW.

The giant hi-tech turbines to be erected on the Dogger Bank, where wind conditions are superb, bear no resemblance to the low-tech, low-yield dwarves of yesteryear. The “capacity factor” is approaching 60pc, which entirely changes the energy equation.

The scale is breathtaking. So what will be done at night or at weekends when renewable power generation is 200pc or more of UK demand?

The Xlinks wind and solar project from the Sahara should provide a tenth of the UK’s electricity demand with baseload consistency at a strike of £48 per MWh as soon as 2028, and that is just for starters.

The latest wind auctions in the UK came in at a low of £37.35 MWh, and averaged £48. Carbon Brief calculates that this is a quarter of the cost of running a gas-powered plant at current prices in the gas spot market – admittedly an anomaly. New wind married with sub-$100 (£82) storage will win the horse race even when gas returns to normal.

Battery technology is in global ferment. They will combine with solar and wind to produce quasi-baseload power locally for most of mankind at a cost that progressively renders the energy infrastructure of the 20th Century obsolete on pure economics.

It is irrelevant where you stand on the hypothesis of man-made global warming. It is free market capitalism that is solving the energy problem, though neither Extinction Rebels nor denialists seem to have noticed. In that respect they are twins.

This country stands to enjoy the first rewards as the 2020s unfold, and probably a surplus in the energy balance of payments by the 2030s. It is the UK’s greatest economic and diplomatic success story this century."
 

ThePrisoner

Well-known member
This bloke thinks it wont be a problem soon.
https://www.telegraph.co.uk/busines...ave-glut-cheap-power-world-leading-batteries/

"Britain will soon have a glut of cheap power, and world-leading batteries to store it." Ambrose Evans-Pritchard's article from 28 July is gushing with a positive but realistic assessment of the amazing leaps we're making in renewables in the UK.

Today’s electricity price shock is the last crisis of the old order. Britain will soon have far more power at times of peak production than it can absorb. The logistical headache will be abundance.

Wind and solar provided almost 60% of the UK’s power for substantial stretches last weekend, briefly peaking at 66%. This is not to make a propaganda point about green energy, although this home-made power is self-evidently displacing liquefied natural gas (LNG) imported right now at nosebleed prices.

It is a point about the mathematical implications of the UK’s gargantuan push for renewables. Offshore wind capacity is going to increase from 11 to 50 gigawatts (GW) by 2030 under the Government’s latest fast-track plans.

RenewableUK says this country currently has a total of 86GW in the project pipeline. This the most ambitious rollout of offshore wind in the world, ahead of China at 78GW, and the US at 48GW.

The giant hi-tech turbines to be erected on the Dogger Bank, where wind conditions are superb, bear no resemblance to the low-tech, low-yield dwarves of yesteryear. The “capacity factor” is approaching 60pc, which entirely changes the energy equation.

The scale is breathtaking. So what will be done at night or at weekends when renewable power generation is 200pc or more of UK demand?

The Xlinks wind and solar project from the Sahara should provide a tenth of the UK’s electricity demand with baseload consistency at a strike of £48 per MWh as soon as 2028, and that is just for starters.

The latest wind auctions in the UK came in at a low of £37.35 MWh, and averaged £48. Carbon Brief calculates that this is a quarter of the cost of running a gas-powered plant at current prices in the gas spot market – admittedly an anomaly. New wind married with sub-$100 (£82) storage will win the horse race even when gas returns to normal.

Battery technology is in global ferment. They will combine with solar and wind to produce quasi-baseload power locally for most of mankind at a cost that progressively renders the energy infrastructure of the 20th Century obsolete on pure economics.

It is irrelevant where you stand on the hypothesis of man-made global warming. It is free market capitalism that is solving the energy problem, though neither Extinction Rebels nor denialists seem to have noticed. In that respect they are twins.

This country stands to enjoy the first rewards as the 2020s unfold, and probably a surplus in the energy balance of payments by the 2030s. It is the UK’s greatest economic and diplomatic success story this century."
Phew! Thank goodness it's sorted. I was getting worried for a while there :rolleyes: :unsure:
 

MolteniArcore

Well-known member
"Britain will soon have a glut of cheap power, and world-leading batteries to store it."

I am always a little sceptical when people come out with phrases like "world-leading". Johnson used to like telling us such things when they were blatantly not.
 

Unravel_Morrison

Well-known member
"Britain will soon have a glut of cheap power, and world-leading batteries to store it."

I am always a little sceptical when people come out with phrases like "world-leading". Johnson used to like telling us such things when they were blatantly not.
It's because it's bollox. Just standard Billy Boy Haw Haw parrotting the Telegraph.
 

chickenrunner

Well-known member
The latest wind auctions in the UK came in at a low of £37.35 MWh, and averaged £48. Carbon Brief calculates that this is a quarter of the cost of running a gas-powered plant at current prices in the gas spot market – admittedly an anomaly. New wind married with sub-$100 (£82) storage will win the horse race even when gas returns to normal.
Snag is that in our sooper dooper free market, capitalist energy market it is the most expensive generator that contributes to the base load that dictates the tariff, we don't even see an average of prices to let alone the cheapest. Of course if it was centrally run (for a working title let's call it the Central Electricity Generating Board for now) we could see an average tariff across all sources of generation and thus be protected against price spikes caused by the fuel of the most expensive generator i.e. gas. The capitalist free market is not the source of our salvation it's the cause of our problems.
 
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