Starmer should tell the teachers to strike

JM14

Well-known member
Call in sick. No local authority in its right mind is going to sack a teacher in this climate are they? Then full schools don't have to close, kids don't get punished by unions playing politics, those teachers who've been vaccinated because of age or medical reasons cam continue on as normal and other school staff who for whatever reason they deem applicable to themselves can stay at home either on furlough pay or sick pay.
The kids get to continue their school education and social education, everybody 'wins'.
Or.....vaccinate them all now before schools go back, no strike, no politics, no isolation/Covid absence, less long term sick. The way we currently stand the schools reopening will be an absolute disaster, and kids education will be hit even further
 

Randy

Well-known member
Or.....vaccinate them all now before schools go back, no strike, no politics, no isolation/Covid absence, less long term sick. The way we currently stand the schools reopening will be an absolute disaster, and kids education will be hit even further
A disaster? Why? You are aware there are thousands of schools open around the word right now aren't you?
 

T_A_D

Active member
It's certainly a big opportunity for people to make their feelings known.
I'll be absolutely staggered if the Tory party had a 'successful' round of results.

I actually disagree. I think they'll do OK, what is the alternative? I'll be voting neither conservative (never have) or Labour (often have).
 

hewielewie

Well-known member
It's not just as simple as continue to teach remotely its not anywhere near being taught in school. My daughter is 6 and she has 2x 40 mins lesson with her teacher a week. We don't have access to a printer so can't print any of her work off so we have to write it out by hand for her. Then that is emailed back and it's counted towards her overall mark for the year. Usually 3 sheets of A4 a day just isn't enough.
2 x 40 minutes a week?! My daughter is 7 and when she isn't in school and at home she has a whole day of Zoom teaching with both the teacher and the TA. My wife is also a teacher and her school are doing the same via teams. If parents don't have printers they can go to the school and collect hard copies of the work and all the timetables are sent via Classdojo. I would question what your daughters school is doing in relation to homeschooling.
 

Archiestephens_elbow

Well-known member
2 x 40 minutes a week?! My daughter is 7 and when she isn't in school and at home she has a whole day of Zoom teaching with both the teacher and the TA. My wife is also a teacher and her school are doing the same via teams. If parents don't have printers they can go to the school and collect hard copies of the work and all the timetables are sent via Classdojo. I would question what your daughters school is doing in relation to homeschooling.
The school will be on bones of its **** due to tory cuts
 

Laughing

Well-known member
2 x 40 minutes a week?! My daughter is 7 and when she isn't in school and at home she has a whole day of Zoom teaching with both the teacher and the TA. My wife is also a teacher and her school are doing the same via teams. If parents don't have printers they can go to the school and collect hard copies of the work and all the timetables are sent via Classdojo. I would question what your daughters school is doing in relation to homeschooling.
My daughter gets exactly the same, a full day, every day of classes. For PE and ART, slightly different. For PE we make her play on the trampolie, for Art the teacher gives them a weekly assignment that they show and tell the following week.

Really well organised where we are.
 

Cambsred

Well-known member
If cases aren't low enough I do fear that bubbles will be sent home regularly and children will suffer more- this will lead to a significant disparity in education between higher case areas again versus lower. I certainly think it would be more distressing for a child to return for 1 week only to be sent home again. https://coronavirus.data.gov.uk/details/interactive-map In Cambridgeshire I would expect far less classroom disruption currently, and when numbers were similar in Sept/Oct last year my families children were in an out of primary school every two or three weeks where schools were not impacted locally to me.

Vaccinating teachers will not 100% stop them getting covid, but if it reduces transmission and the potential for serious illness, as well as reduces the risk of a bubble of 30 children being sent home, or in some cases 100s of children when teaching across classes it surely seems sensible.

Death continues to be used as a metric for success in Covid, while Long Covid and post viral complications are overlooked as insignificant. The burden on the country due to free spread of this virus has not been calculated yet, and I hope it isn't something that comes back to haunt us.
 

FatCat

Well-known member
Everyone saying teachers should just get on it with it. Would you be happy with 30 random people coming into your front room 6 times a day?
No not at all, I haven’t followed this story - I don’t understand what is the rational for not vaccinating teachers - if you want schools to go back surely it’s a must that teachers are vaccinated first or am I missing something?
 

Randy

Well-known member
Death continues to be used as a metric for success in Covid, while Long Covid and post viral complications are overlooked as insignificant. The burden on the country due to free spread of this virus has not been calculated yet, and I hope it isn't something that comes back to haunt us.
Schools are open in other countries with worse rates than ours.

It's not just the burden of the virus that hasn't been calculated. Missed cancer screenings, GP referrals, etc haven't been calculated either.
 

Soutra

Well-known member
No not at all, I haven’t followed this story - I don’t understand what is the rational for not vaccinating teachers - if you want schools to go back surely it’s a must that teachers are vaccinated first or am I missing something?
Some teachers will have been jabbed already, and the ones that haven't are not likely to be in the group likely to suffer more than cold or flu symptoms from any Covid infection. Of course we are told vaccinations reduce the transmissability of Covid, but the strategy seems to be to jab the most vulnerable first. Given that the NHS is jabbing people as fast as they can, I guess the epidemiologists think the current strategy has the best chance of success.
 

tripleheader

Well-known member
Here are some of the reasons why schools are going to re-open, in it he points out that Teachers are not in a high risk profession compared with others that are ie nurses, care workers . But the driving point is that it is the mental and physical health and well being of the children is the motivator.
 

Laughing

Well-known member
It's a difficult one. There are lots of proffessions who are down the queue for vaccination and should, perhaps be higher, there is a pace at which we can vaccinate and that is the bottleneck. Should the Police refuse to work, supermarket checkout operators, amazon delivery drivers.

The question then becomes, what is the risk in teachers of average age taking full sized classes. I don't know, but they should be presented with the data and be allowed to make their own decision based on personal circumstances.

The unions will, undoubtedly weigh in on this as they are responsible to represent their members. At 56 years old, if I were a teacher I would be reluctant to step into a classroom until I was vaccinated. At 35 years old, not so much.

It is ultimately non of Starmers business and he has no say in when and how schools go back, so he should stay quiet on teachers returning, unless he can provide data that shows it is inherently unsafe.
 

Cambsred

Well-known member
Schools are open in other countries with worse rates than ours.

It's not just the burden of the virus that hasn't been calculated. Missed cancer screenings, GP referrals, etc haven't been calculated either.

Indeed. Health, Economic, Societal, Developmental. I'm very much in support of schools going back, it is a must. However, protecting the population and our educators is also ultimately important. We are a year in now and the schools are in the same position they were in when we opened back up, and prior to us locking down unfortunately.
 
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