Scrapping the 1m plus social distancing rule in June

zorro_mfc

Well-known member
Surely this will lead to a spike and therefore an inevitable third/fourth wave.

I’m all for easing lockdown restrictions but this seems like madness to me, especially with so many still to have the first if not second jab.
 

Randy

Well-known member
Good.

A huge majority of the country will have received a vaccine by June 21st.

1 death reported today, June 21st is over 50 days away.

Schools reopening hasn't caused a spike, indoor shopping hasn't caused a spike, care homes allowing visits hasn't caused a spike, non of the test events so far have caused a spike.

Also politicians blue and red haven't been following the rules for months now behind closed doors, the various leaked photos and videos prove it.
 
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atypical_boro

Well-known member
There have been raves and gigs; albeit on a trial basis.

If we don’t work towards scrapping it now, when will we scrap it? Of course there will be rises in positive tests but surely the idea is there will be a much lower amount of deaths and hospitalisations, but we won’t know until we try it.
 

Alvez_48

Well-known member
It's best we just stop this hugging malarkey permanently. It's simply not human to feel another's warm embrace. The feelings of love, hope and happiness are just silly chemical reactions in the brain. Aren't worth anything.
 

GazC_MFC

Well-known member
Surely this will lead to a spike and therefore an inevitable third/fourth wave.

I’m all for easing lockdown restrictions but this seems like madness to me, especially with so many still to have the first if not second jab.
The government are testing mass events in the lead up to this. They’ve been really slow in releasing restrictions this time. At least for once it seems to be scientifically led
 

Borotommo

Well-known member
....and mathematically modelled. The race vaccine v virus is being won. It just depends on the variants:

V > v, V ~ (v + v)
 

Cambsred

Well-known member
I think the 1 metre rule of all the rules seems a sensible one to let go of next. its not really based on a lot. Initially the science was suggesting one metre if the virus was only droplet led.

The most important thing to invest time and effort into is good ventilation for me. especially in the winter months. get clean fresh air circulating well. and keep washing hands lots.

we have to endeavour for normality slowly, and interventions/ actions that can be implemented more permanantly to support that are key.
 

TheYorkshireTerrier

Well-known member
I think the 1 metre rule of all the rules seems a sensible one to let go of next. its not really based on a lot. Initially the science was suggesting one metre if the virus was only droplet led.

The most important thing to invest time and effort into is good ventilation for me. especially in the winter months. get clean fresh air circulating well. and keep washing hands lots.

we have to endeavour for normality slowly, and interventions/ actions that can be implemented more permanantly to support that are key.

Yeah, I don't mind going back to an office, as long as it actually has windows that open and close... unlike the one I worked in pre-COVID 🤨
 

Frozen Horse

Well-known member
Assuming we are going to get rid of it at some point, the only argument I can see against doing it then is that not everyone will be vaccinated.

That said, we're always going to have some who won't be vaccinated, as that is their choice.

As has been said, the 1m rule isn't based on strong science.

I take a lot of encouragement from the fact that easing of lockdown 3+ weeks ago has been followed by nothing more than continued decline in infection rates, despite lasses scrapping outside of pubs in York on the first day of opening etc....
 

Laughing

Well-known member
I am not sure there was ever any good evidence to support a 1m rule. Indoors the air becomes saturated with the virus very quickly. Outdoors, hmm maybe.

Kids have been sardined into classrooms for months now with no spike. Anyone who thinks kids socially distance, clearly doesn't have any.

People have been packing into shops for weeks with no spike.

Zorro, I don't think you have a lot to worry about at the minute. A new variant, then maybe, but right now all evidence suggests we are good to go.

Whilst I dislike hand sanitizer, I would like to see that as a thing moving forward, in fact forever. It's cheap, non-intrusive and will help with lots of different diseases.
 

bear66

Well-known member
I am not sure there was ever any good evidence to support a 1m rule. Indoors the air becomes saturated with the virus very quickly. Outdoors, hmm maybe.

Kids have been sardined into classrooms for months now with no spike. Anyone who thinks kids socially distance, clearly doesn't have any.

People have been packing into shops for weeks with no spike.

Zorro, I don't think you have a lot to worry about at the minute. A new variant, then maybe, but right now all evidence suggests we are good to go.

Whilst I dislike hand sanitizer, I would like to see that as a thing moving forward, in fact forever. It's cheap, non-intrusive and will help with lots of different diseases.
The decision at the beginning that this wasn't an airborne virus, but droplets that drop to the floor indoors, appears to be wrong. So the only thing 2m versus 1m will do is minimise the high viral load of a cough in the face. Hopefully, the vaccination programme, for those not fully protected, is minimising the viral load in those who subsequently get infected. There was an early German study where a house with two infected people was swabbed down and no signs of the virus was detected; this should have raised questions about the droplet theory.

School classrooms appear to be only areas where there have been increases in infections since March. They increased till Easter, fell away and are now rising again, albeit very slowly. Part of the reason for a measurable increase will be the increased testing of that age group, so it is only indicative of an increase rather than the rate of increase compared with a mostly untested general population.

heatmap.jpg
 

Laughing

Well-known member
The decision at the beginning that this wasn't an airborne virus, but droplets that drop to the floor indoors, appears to be wrong. So the only thing 2m versus 1m will do is minimise the high viral load of a cough in the face. Hopefully, the vaccination programme, for those not fully protected, is minimising the viral load in those who subsequently get infected. There was an early German study where a house with two infected people was swabbed down and no signs of the virus was detected; this should have raised questions about the droplet theory.

School classrooms appear to be only areas where there have been increases in infections since March. They increased till Easter, fell away and are now rising again, albeit very slowly. Part of the reason for a measurable increase will be the increased testing of that age group, so it is only indicative of an increase rather than the rate of increase compared with a mostly untested general population.

View attachment 18175
That's what I said, without the in-depth explanation and the fancy graphics, admittedly.:)
 

Randy

Well-known member
You're telling me, it was unbearable in the summer.

Didn't help that if one person moaned about the air con being too cold, it was turned off for the entire building.
We have **** hot ventilation in the kitchen at work (obviously) but it's still like working in the breath of a dragon in the summer 😮💨
 
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