Qatar knocked out

TeaCider

Well-known member
Probably posted about in threads last night, but I thought it deserved its own.

Qatar have become the first ever World Cup host to be knocked out after only 2 games, and unless they surprisingly beat the Netherlands, they're going to be the first host to fail to win a game.

It's also funny that they're the first team knocked out.

Couldn't happen to a nicer country 😊.
 

atypical_boro

Well-known member
Earliest a side (I presume in terms of matches/days) has ever been knocked out of a World Cup.

That said, I have no beef with the Qatari players or Qatari nationals as such. They don’t all represent the hideous regime.
 

John67

Well-known member
Flying with them on 10th December so I have no issues with the Qatari Regime and think they are giving us a magnificent WC (Just in case anyone from that regime pops onto FMTTM). Returning on 8th Jan, where my opinion, as a gay man, of what some have said is a corrupt, cruel, nasty bunch of b***ds may have changed. Who knows 😉
 

Glover_elbow

Well-known member
Sad to see how much of this country they have bought up

How Qatar’s riches touch millions of UK lives
Published


By Dharshini David
Global trade correspondent, BBC News
Qatar hosting the World Cup has drawn widespread criticism over its record on rights for women, LGBTQ+ groups and migrant workers. The attendance of officials, teams, even fans has been questioned. But our connection with Qatar goes way beyond the current tournament, touching most of our lives.

Some may query if we are right to foster such ties with a regime whose values may appear to be at odds with British ones.

At the core of that relationship is gas. Qatar is a tiny country about the size of Yorkshire but it has one of the largest natural reserves on the planet - and the UK is a key customer.

About half our gas is imported and about half of that comes via a pipeline from Norway. But Qatar is second on that list supplying about 9% of our energy imports. In theory, that's the amount needed to power the boilers of around a million British homes. In the space of less than 20 years, Qatar has become a vital part of our energy mix.

Why are the World Cup 2022 finals in Qatar so controversial?
Qatar has channelled its booming gas-based wealth into embedding itself into the UK's corporate and property landscape, and cementing a relationship with the top tiers of British establishment.

Its monarch, the Emir, was one of the few Gulf leaders to attend the Queen's funeral. The current King accepted a donation for his charitable foundation worth over £2m (part of which was allegedly handed over in Fortnum and Mason's carrier bags) from a former Qatari political leader in 2015.

Highly unusually, our nations' air forces have formed two joint squadrons - one of which is patrolling the skies above World Cup venues.

And in September, Qatar took ownership of 24 fighter jets built in Lancashire, part of a £5bn deal with BAE systems.

Sheikh Tamim bin Hamad Al Thani, Emir of Qatar and Prince Charles, Prince of Wales
IMAGE SOURCE,GETTY IMAGES
Image caption,
Emir of Qatar, Sheikh Tamim bin Hamad Al Thani and King Charles pictured at Royal Ascot in 2014
On the ground, the Qatari government has been recycling some of its cash by investing in the UK. It's not one of our largest investors - but its holdings are strategically chosen to maximise profile and influence. It is among the dozen biggest property owners in Britain.

Central to its property empire are landmarks including the Shard, Canary Wharf and the Shell Centre redevelopment on London's South Bank.

The Qatari government also owns luxury department store Harrods and 5* hotel Claridge's in London.

And in our day-to-day life it has significant shareholdings some of our biggest brands. Bank with Barclays, shop at Sainsbury's or use Heathrow airport, and Qatar benefits. Turn on the tap as a Severn Trent water customer, and your bill adds to its profits.

In total, Qatar's state investment arm has invested about £40bn, in areas which touch millions of British lives, and designed to ensure the influence of that tiny country punches far above its weight on British soil.

And they are funds our government has welcomed - and is keen to boost. In May, then Prime Minister Boris Johnson trumpeted an agreement for Qatar to invest up to £10bn over the next five years in the UK in sectors from cybersecurity to life sciences.

UK natural gas imports
Meanwhile, our reliance on Qatari gas could rise in the future. The UK government has been nurturing the relationship with Doha, to ensure security of supply as North Sea reserves dwindle.

Britain in recent months has succeeded in cutting out imports from Russia. That was only about 4% of the UK total - but it makes the gas we source from Qatar even more crucial.

The EU is far more reliant on Russian gas, so securing alternatives is even more pressing.

Overall, the EU only got 5% of its gas from Qatar - but that could change. Olaf Scholz, chancellor of the bloc's biggest gas guzzler - Germany - has said that Qatar will play a central role in the country's strategy to diversify away from Russian gas. But it won't happen overnight.

Contract negotiations have been tricky. Qatar likes to supply gas under long-term deals, lasting 15-20 years, which may not be consistent with Western nations aims to decarbonise.

By contrast, China, with its less ambitious net-zero plans, has unveiled a 27-year agreement to buy a massive $60bn worth of Qatari gas. And Germany needs to boost its infrastructure, the terminals which receive the liquified natural gas - known as LNG - in order to take on more supplies.

The UK is ahead of the game in the latter - thanks to cooperation from Qatar. The country is a majority owner of the South Hook terminal in Wales, where LNG is offloaded into special containers. It's claimed the site can hold a fifth of the UK's daily gas needs - the Qatari government is investing millions to up that capacity by a quarter by 2025.

And by that point, Qatar is expecting to double its LNG output - with no shortage of customers. Many Asian nations are vying with Europe to tie down supplies to ensure energy security - and Qatar is seen as a relatively reliable and geopolitically tame option. The alternatives may not be attractive: for example, while part of the world's largest gas field falls in Qatari water, the rest lies in Iran's (the two countries produce gas independently).

Some of us may not be able to locate the country on a map but our relationship with Qatar seems set only to become closer in the years to come
 

Ipad1977

Well-known member
Probably posted about in threads last night, but I thought it deserved its own.

Qatar have become the first ever World Cup host to be knocked out after only 2 games, and unless they surprisingly beat the Netherlands, they're going to be the first host to fail to win a game.

It's also funny that they're the first team knocked out.

Couldn't happen to a nicer country 😊.
I want more. I want them not to even gain a single point by the Dutch beating them soundly into the bargain.😁 Which they should do, unless of course they rest players for the knockouts, go for the draw which will guarantee them qualification and play like puddings to boot.

It's just a pity that Senegal switched off for a short period as I'd have even liked Qatar to have been dumped out without scoring a solitary goal. Greedy Ipad!😛
 

Ipad1977

Well-known member
First rational post on Qatar I've seen on here.
It is rational and I have no beef with "the man in the street" in any country really, though you can guarantee that Qataris will contain more misogynists than the average country that is of course almost solely down to the regime/their upbringing.

However the locals over there will (unless they are hopelessly optimistic) have expected precious little from this world Cup, even with their somehow being Asian champions so won't have been massively shell-shocked. The puppet-masters themselves on the other hand will have been left with a great big proverbial pie squashed into their faces which is a delight.
 

BaronSmoggie

Well-known member
It is rational and I have no beef with "the man in the street" in any country really, though you can guarantee that Qataris will contain more misogynists than the average country that is of course almost solely down to the regime/their upbringing.

However the locals over there will (unless they are hopelessly optimistic) have expected precious little from this world Cup, even with their somehow being Asian champions so won't have been massively shell-shocked. The puppet-masters themselves on the other hand will have been left with a great big proverbial pie squashed into their faces which is a delight.
The locals form a small part of the total population, so if it is full of misogynists, a lot of them are expats too. Everything else though I agree with.

I worked there for 3 years, and there are a lot of decent people who just want to live their lives, don't believe in the governments rules for suppression and the laws, but its their home, and fighting for change is done in small steps from within. Not from a group of westerners in rainbow colours shouting from the rooftops.

John Barnes said something I agreed with which was, you are going there? Their culture is different, so respect it. Its not F***ing rocket science, is it? If you don't agree with it, don't go.

I'm not defending Qatar here, just offering a different point of view.
 

LowMoorBoro

Well-known member
It is rational and I have no beef with "the man in the street" in any country really, though you can guarantee that Qataris will contain more misogynists than the average country that is of course almost solely down to the regime/their upbringing.

However the locals over there will (unless they are hopelessly optimistic) have expected precious little from this world Cup, even with their somehow being Asian champions so won't have been massively shell-shocked. The puppet-masters themselves on the other hand will have been left with a great big proverbial pie squashed into their faces which is a delight.
Do the locals care that much? For a home nation the atmosphere at their games has been flat even before they conceded.
 

BaronSmoggie

Well-known member
Do the locals care that much? For a home nation the atmosphere at their games has been flat even before they conceded.
No they don't. Football doesn't feature much on the national pysche. Local team games have a few 100 supporters in stadiums that can hold thousands. I used to go to Al Gharrafa games when I was there. More noise in a morgue.
 

Priv

Well-known member
Do the locals care that much? For a home nation the atmosphere at their games has been flat even before they conceded.
From what I’ve seen on Facebook and Twitter they are more interested in having a pop at any westerners for any mention of LGBT, rainbows, human rights or corruption.
 

Smoginexile

Well-known member
Dear FMTTM

Please stop posting nasty comments about the qatar world cup.
All host countries have their faults.
But I will say one thing that the Qatar government had in its favour over all the other nations that wanted to have this world cup.
££££££££££££££££££££££££££££££££££££££££££££££££££.
By the way
If you make it worth my while I can also arrange for the Boro to win promotion.
Just send a suitcase full of cash to Blatter enterprises ltd and I will do the rest.
The offer is on the table if you want it.
No pressure.
👍
 
Last edited:

Glover_elbow

Well-known member
Dear FMTTM

Please stop posting nasty comments about the qatar world cup.
All host countries have their faults.
But I will say one thing that the Qatar government had in its favour over all the other nations that wanted to have this world cup.
££££££££££££££££££££££££££££££££££££££££££££££££££.
By the way
If you make it worth my while I can also arrange for the Boro to win promotion.
Just send a suitcase full of cash to Blatter enterprises ltd and I will do the rest.
The offer is on the table if you want it.
No pressure.
👍
Same suitcase as king chuck received
 

Lemmy_kilmister

Well-known member
No they don't. Football doesn't feature much on the national pysche. Local team games have a few 100 supporters in stadiums that can hold thousands. I used to go to Al Gharrafa games when I was there. More noise in a morgue.
I played at the Al-Arabi stadium 21 years ago. That held a fair few thousand.
 
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