Job Hunting

truck

Active member
Good luck FC, hope one of them comes in
Recently been made redundant and hope to god it's not a year before I find another role. 61 early next year so CV is tweaked not to reveal age so I hopefully get a foot through the door but at the moment it is very slow going, lots of roles flag up on searches but then experience in that particular industry asked for (looking for sales / business development roles) I'll just keep battling on.
 

Angus

Active member
Good luck and well done FC. Keep going truck I’m sure everyone on the site wishes you the best of luck as well.
 

FatCat

Well-known member
What area do you work in pal?
I echo the good luck sentiments wished by others. Many may bemoan work at certain times, myself included, but the structure and purpose it gives to our lives should not be underestimated.
Obviously the dosh doesn’t go amiss either.
Business Analysis normally which is quite broad but generally putting in new banking systems.
 
good luck mate.

Try and prepare the best that you can, not sure the industry your jobs are in but I've got a background in recruitment and now do professional coaching and the one thing which consistently lets people down is a lack of preparation for interviews.
 

Artie Fufkin

Well-known member
Sorry, this is a long one!

Very best of luck FatCat, genuinely, and everyone else out there looking at the moment. It is NOT easy as I have found out, as follows…

I have kept this from the board until now as I have felt particularly uncomfortable about it, and whilst I have mentioned I was looking for a new job a couple of times, I was being somewhat economical with the truth in so far as I was made redundant in August. I was looking to move industry and roles prior to this, I just hoped I had been able to do it on my own terms. The last 4 months have been extremely difficult, not necessarily financially (although JSA is a pittance and I was only entitled to 5 months of JSA despite having paid NI without a break for over 20 years) as I got about 6 months’ pay, but psychologically it has been a nightmare. My family and friends have been great, but it’s not the same when you can’t see them. My wife has been a complete legend, putting up with my moods and constantly cheering me on from the side-lines as well as offering invaluable advise

All you can do is try to remain positive, which I know from bitter experience can be extremely hard to do.

After 153 applications since I found out I was losing my job towards the end of July, I have had 24 interviews. The last one of which was the 7th Dec at 3pm. At 5.30pm that day they offered me the position which I didn't need much thinking time to accept!

I've yet to get a start date, but it should be in the New Year (possibly earlier) as the role is ready to go and they're keen to get the new programme off the ground at lightening pace, due to it's nature, it has to begin and to move fast. I’ve just returned from my pre-employment and ID check as it happens

The point is that no matter how hard it is, you must keep going. I structured my day around searching on about 20 different sites and taking the time to tailor each application to meet the exact requirements of the role. It's a pain and it's hard work sometimes, but it's absolutely necessary. I 'worked' from about 8am to about 3pm every day (odd ‘day off’ when I went hiking). If there's ever a contact email or number with a job advert, ALWAYS make prior contact if it's something you really want - I can’t overstate how much that helps with an application. It gets your name at the forefront of people’s thoughts and shows a degree of interest and willing that sets you apart from other applicants. It was crucial for me getting the offer I have accepted

The other thing I did was keep a spreadsheet of everything I’d applied for – company, position, date applied, closing date, salary, etc. I was a bit OCD about it with different colours for ‘live’ jobs and those I had been unsuccessful in. I made notes on why I hadn’t got certain roles and tried to eliminate those weaknesses or misgivings from any further applications

I wrote about a dozen different behavioural statements and competency statements as well as getting my CV and covering letters as good as I could. Detailing your transferable skills using the STAR (Situation, Task, Action, Result) approach is a good way of not just saying “I am good at xyz”, but demonstrating with real life examples how you are good at xyz

Interview preparation is absolutely crucial. Research the company in real detail prior to an interview (I was looking at annual reports, company history and news, etc.) and make sure you tick off all the ‘essential criteria’ for each post. I also learnt a load of buzzwords that I tried to get in each interview – some interviewers are just looking for a few key phrases initially to let them know you’re the right sort of candidate

I’ve deliberately refrained from posting on this thread until now for 2 reasons:

1) I don’t want to seem like I am gloating or anything, I hope it doesn’t come across as such

2) I’ve wanted to get the new job signed on the dotted line before I mentioned it so as not to jinx anything – didn’t want any last-minute issues!


If can pass on any other tips or advice, I'm happy to do so, just ask away!

And good luck, keep in there – you’ll have some rubbish days where it really gets you down as I’m sure you’ll know already, I know I certainly did and it’s hard work. Up until last Monday I had done 10 straight days of interviews, sometimes 2 in a day with presentations, tasks to complete in real time, etc. and it wears you down, but resilience and determination are 2 key personal attributes that are as important as any qualification
 

1finny

Well-known member
Sorry, this is a long one!

Very best of luck FatCat, genuinely, and everyone else out there looking at the moment. It is NOT easy as I have found out, as follows…

I have kept this from the board until now as I have felt particularly uncomfortable about it, and whilst I have mentioned I was looking for a new job a couple of times, I was being somewhat economical with the truth in so far as I was made redundant in August. I was looking to move industry and roles prior to this, I just hoped I had been able to do it on my own terms. The last 4 months have been extremely difficult, not necessarily financially (although JSA is a pittance and I was only entitled to 5 months of JSA despite having paid NI without a break for over 20 years) as I got about 6 months’ pay, but psychologically it has been a nightmare. My family and friends have been great, but it’s not the same when you can’t see them. My wife has been a complete legend, putting up with my moods and constantly cheering me on from the side-lines as well as offering invaluable advise

All you can do is try to remain positive, which I know from bitter experience can be extremely hard to do.

After 153 applications since I found out I was losing my job towards the end of July, I have had 24 interviews. The last one of which was the 7th Dec at 3pm. At 5.30pm that day they offered me the position which I didn't need much thinking time to accept!

I've yet to get a start date, but it should be in the New Year (possibly earlier) as the role is ready to go and they're keen to get the new programme off the ground at lightening pace, due to it's nature, it has to begin and to move fast. I’ve just returned from my pre-employment and ID check as it happens

The point is that no matter how hard it is, you must keep going. I structured my day around searching on about 20 different sites and taking the time to tailor each application to meet the exact requirements of the role. It's a pain and it's hard work sometimes, but it's absolutely necessary. I 'worked' from about 8am to about 3pm every day (odd ‘day off’ when I went hiking). If there's ever a contact email or number with a job advert, ALWAYS make prior contact if it's something you really want - I can’t overstate how much that helps with an application. It gets your name at the forefront of people’s thoughts and shows a degree of interest and willing that sets you apart from other applicants. It was crucial for me getting the offer I have accepted

The other thing I did was keep a spreadsheet of everything I’d applied for – company, position, date applied, closing date, salary, etc. I was a bit OCD about it with different colours for ‘live’ jobs and those I had been unsuccessful in. I made notes on why I hadn’t got certain roles and tried to eliminate those weaknesses or misgivings from any further applications

I wrote about a dozen different behavioural statements and competency statements as well as getting my CV and covering letters as good as I could. Detailing your transferable skills using the STAR (Situation, Task, Action, Result) approach is a good way of not just saying “I am good at xyz”, but demonstrating with real life examples how you are good at xyz

Interview preparation is absolutely crucial. Research the company in real detail prior to an interview (I was looking at annual reports, company history and news, etc.) and make sure you tick off all the ‘essential criteria’ for each post. I also learnt a load of buzzwords that I tried to get in each interview – some interviewers are just looking for a few key phrases initially to let them know you’re the right sort of candidate

I’ve deliberately refrained from posting on this thread until now for 2 reasons:

1) I don’t want to seem like I am gloating or anything, I hope it doesn’t come across as such

2) I’ve wanted to get the new job signed on the dotted line before I mentioned it so as not to jinx anything – didn’t want any last-minute issues!


If can pass on any other tips or advice, I'm happy to do so, just ask away!

And good luck, keep in there – you’ll have some rubbish days where it really gets you down as I’m sure you’ll know already, I know I certainly did and it’s hard work. Up until last Monday I had done 10 straight days of interviews, sometimes 2 in a day with presentations, tasks to complete in real time, etc. and it wears you down, but resilience and determination are 2 key personal attributes that are as important as any qualification

Delighted for you Artie
And, I’m sure this post will be taken the right way - you mean well
 

FatCat

Well-known member
Sorry, this is a long one!

Very best of luck FatCat, genuinely, and everyone else out there looking at the moment. It is NOT easy as I have found out, as follows…

I have kept this from the board until now as I have felt particularly uncomfortable about it, and whilst I have mentioned I was looking for a new job a couple of times, I was being somewhat economical with the truth in so far as I was made redundant in August. I was looking to move industry and roles prior to this, I just hoped I had been able to do it on my own terms. The last 4 months have been extremely difficult, not necessarily financially (although JSA is a pittance and I was only entitled to 5 months of JSA despite having paid NI without a break for over 20 years) as I got about 6 months’ pay, but psychologically it has been a nightmare. My family and friends have been great, but it’s not the same when you can’t see them. My wife has been a complete legend, putting up with my moods and constantly cheering me on from the side-lines as well as offering invaluable advise

All you can do is try to remain positive, which I know from bitter experience can be extremely hard to do.

After 153 applications since I found out I was losing my job towards the end of July, I have had 24 interviews. The last one of which was the 7th Dec at 3pm. At 5.30pm that day they offered me the position which I didn't need much thinking time to accept!

I've yet to get a start date, but it should be in the New Year (possibly earlier) as the role is ready to go and they're keen to get the new programme off the ground at lightening pace, due to it's nature, it has to begin and to move fast. I’ve just returned from my pre-employment and ID check as it happens

The point is that no matter how hard it is, you must keep going. I structured my day around searching on about 20 different sites and taking the time to tailor each application to meet the exact requirements of the role. It's a pain and it's hard work sometimes, but it's absolutely necessary. I 'worked' from about 8am to about 3pm every day (odd ‘day off’ when I went hiking). If there's ever a contact email or number with a job advert, ALWAYS make prior contact if it's something you really want - I can’t overstate how much that helps with an application. It gets your name at the forefront of people’s thoughts and shows a degree of interest and willing that sets you apart from other applicants. It was crucial for me getting the offer I have accepted

The other thing I did was keep a spreadsheet of everything I’d applied for – company, position, date applied, closing date, salary, etc. I was a bit OCD about it with different colours for ‘live’ jobs and those I had been unsuccessful in. I made notes on why I hadn’t got certain roles and tried to eliminate those weaknesses or misgivings from any further applications

I wrote about a dozen different behavioural statements and competency statements as well as getting my CV and covering letters as good as I could. Detailing your transferable skills using the STAR (Situation, Task, Action, Result) approach is a good way of not just saying “I am good at xyz”, but demonstrating with real life examples how you are good at xyz

Interview preparation is absolutely crucial. Research the company in real detail prior to an interview (I was looking at annual reports, company history and news, etc.) and make sure you tick off all the ‘essential criteria’ for each post. I also learnt a load of buzzwords that I tried to get in each interview – some interviewers are just looking for a few key phrases initially to let them know you’re the right sort of candidate

I’ve deliberately refrained from posting on this thread until now for 2 reasons:

1) I don’t want to seem like I am gloating or anything, I hope it doesn’t come across as such

2) I’ve wanted to get the new job signed on the dotted line before I mentioned it so as not to jinx anything – didn’t want any last-minute issues!


If can pass on any other tips or advice, I'm happy to do so, just ask away!

And good luck, keep in there – you’ll have some rubbish days where it really gets you down as I’m sure you’ll know already, I know I certainly did and it’s hard work. Up until last Monday I had done 10 straight days of interviews, sometimes 2 in a day with presentations, tasks to complete in real time, etc. and it wears you down, but resilience and determination are 2 key personal attributes that are as important as any qualification
Thanks for that it is very close to the life I have been living this last 18months , I’ve had so many false starts two weeks ago from nowhere it looked like I’d got myself a job with the company talking about completing on boarding checks etc for it to fall through within 24hrs - that was hard to take I felt defeated for the first time and was very quiet for a couple of days.
My Mrs has been a star also helping with advice, I am getting close but I just don’t want to be in a position where I have to go to her for money - I would find that very difficult having worked all my life. I’ve laid awake at night thinking about this and it’s not a nice place to be!
I tell myself tomorrow will be a better day and I remind myself what I am going through is minor compared to others at the moment - I have my health and for that I’m thankful. Hopefully good news is around the corner!
 

Artie Fufkin

Well-known member
Thanks for that it is very close to the life I have been living this last 18months , I’ve had so many false starts two weeks ago from nowhere it looked like I’d got myself a job with the company talking about completing on boarding checks etc for it to fall through within 24hrs - that was hard to take I felt defeated for the first time and was very quiet for a couple of days.
My Mrs has been a star also helping with advice, I am getting close but I just don’t want to be in a position where I have to go to her for money - I would find that very difficult having worked all my life. I’ve laid awake at night thinking about this and it’s not a nice place to be!
I tell myself tomorrow will be a better day and I remind myself what I am going through is minor compared to others at the moment - I have my health and for that I’m thankful. Hopefully good news is around the corner!
I hope so, it sounds like you've got a good attitude and mentality towards this and I'm sure with that taken into account, something IS just around the corner
 

Smog in Wilts

Well-known member
Good luck to everyone who is in a similar position, and congratulations to those that have found something new.
I have recently started up a new business and are having problems finding good people. Unfortunately I am not based in the North East and are too far to commute. It is important to stress the skills that may be useful to the employer and not write a biography and maybe consider starting in a lower position with a hope that you can make the business and your position grow into what you want.
Good luck to everyone and believe that there are better things around the corner.
 

truck

Active member
I hope so, and cheers finny. The relief is quite something!

Congrats, and I know what you mean, sitting down and treating the job search as a job, for 5-6 hoursa day is the way to do it, there is a bit of frustration on some sites and lack of covering letter to go with an application and it can become a mess of what you have applied for and when. One of the things I found out.
Some sites like total jobs send the same roles out day after day, and its annoying when click on a possible role and see its already closed.
Some are now saying nothing will happen until the new year so applications are in a black hole.
Fingers crossed 2021 is a better year for all of us I am sure you cannot wait for it to come around now.
 

Ingleby_Flash

Well-known member
Amazing Artie, well done. Brilliant way to think I of applying for a job as a job. Over the years I’ve looked at thousands of CV’s and interviewed many hundreds and seen some complete dross, I could tell some tales that would, or at least should, shock. You’re right, prep, make sure you tick most of the boxes and the one thing I’ll add as advice - when you turn up at the interview come across as a real person who is genuinely interested.
 
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