I cannot stand Tories but....

#4
I think Hancock has done better than I thought he would at least he has the grace to look embarrassed when toeing the party lie... line.

Out of the sad bunch of chancers, traitors and robber barons, Sunak and Hancock have at least appeared to care and have a modicum of competence.

I imagine that this has not gone unnoticed among the likes of Gove et al and when all this is over Rishi will feel the sharp sting of a plotter's blade between his shoulder blades.
 
#6
He has been decent.. doesn't help that labour have folded into non existence and haven't any kind of counter argument to what the Tory's are doing.

It begs the question where they found the magic money trees etc, I've not looked into how much big business stand to trouser as I've not had time.

The American bailout package is an absolute travesty for them though.
 
#7
For one so inexperienced and given the circumstances we are in he’s been very impressive, keeps things as simple as possible and when needed offers, concise, clear explanations. I suppose it helps that he doesn’t need to try and balance the books and most of what he’s offering is good news in difficult times but he’s come across very well.
 
#8
At times like this I feel that HM Opposition should be involved in all decisions and that as far as possible a consensus in the best interests of the country should be achieved. I confess I haven't followed the politicing very closely but I feel it is rather unfair to criticise the lack of opposition in this instance.
 

bear66

Well-known member
#9
There has been a lot of cross party agreement with sensible policy questioning. Read an interesting article yesterday that suggested Starmer, once elected, may get invited to COBRA at least (even possibly government of national unity) for the simple reason Johnson will want to share the blame.
 

WeeGord

Well-known member
#10
....Rishi Sunak is mightily impressive. He just answers questions factually, from an informed position, in an informative manner. He reassures and clearly knows his onions. Considering he’s new to the role, in possibly the most difficult time in history for a chancellor, he absolutely looks the part to me. Credit where it’s due.
I agree - he seems to be the one cool head, composed and reassuring during his press conferences so credit where its due.
 
#11
He's had a rapid rise to his current position and I'm not sure his roles in the city give me a lot of confidence in his politics, but then he is right-wing so maybe its an obvious thing to say.

But politics apart he is very intelligent and shows the current incumbent up for what he is - out of his depth.

I predict he'll be the next PM, assuming Labour don't get their act together, although in Kier Starmer I think we'll at last have Labour leader that has a broad enough appeal to be electable.
 
#12
Which apparently shows that it doesn't matter what you say, as long as you say it with confidence?

Millions of self-employed people will be buggered by June. Judging by the response of the CBI and unions, I would imagine that was the objective.
 
#14
I think he has a distinct advantage that he is new to higher office and has no baggage. He’s a new face so appears fresh and stress free. He has a blank cheque and a bank full of money. He has no previous references to ‘the cupboard is bare’ or ’there is no magic money tree’ or ‘carefully priced manifesto’ to weigh him down so he has been given a free hit in that respect.

We will get past the virus and then the enormous public spending bill will have to be paid whilst the economy is inevitably at a low ebb. You can’t help but think there will be a sting in the tail somewhere.

I think that will be the time to judge Rishi.

He seems like a decent enough bloke though and more trustworthy than Johnson.
 
#15
I really appreciate his honesty. None of the populist bluster and casual reassurances. Much better that he has told some people that no, there won't or can't be help.

At least then these people can try and do something rather than hang on to a false promise and be even worse off.

The casual attitudes and Tim Nice But Dim approaches of Johnson and Trump are hugely damaging. People listen and accept that nonsense when they need to be told the cold, hard truth.
 

1finny

Well-known member
#16
He comes across really well.
I think the delay for self employed relief was poor for those in need.
As for those saying he is ‘honest’ - come on, he’s a politician, we have no idea.
That’s the same for all of them by the way
 
#17
He did place an ominous sounding line in the middle of his speech about all of us paying the same rate of tax. I assume he means that self employed are going to lose some of their exemptions from National Insurance in the future
 
#20
I think he has a distinct advantage that he is new to higher office and has no baggage. He’s a new face so appears fresh and stress free. He has a blank cheque and a bank full of money. He has no previous references to ‘the cupboard is bare’ or ’there is no magic money tree’ or ‘carefully priced manifesto’ to weigh him down so he has been given a free hit in that respect.

We will get past the virus and then the enormous public spending bill will have to be paid whilst the economy is inevitably at a low ebb. You can’t help but think there will be a sting in the tail somewhere.

I think that will be the time to judge Rishi.

He seems like a decent enough bloke though and more trustworthy than Johnson.
He has a Blair like quality about him. Is that a good thing.
 
Top