Electric Car Advice

weemoby

Well-known member
"Triggered?".
In my opinion no Andy, and I say this as a massive tree hugger.

The response to the OP's post is related to previous threads about electric cars and certain board members dogmatic views on the topic.
 

fella

Well-known member
You'd he better off plugging a hen in to a lemon overnight and riding the hen to work. If your Tesla breaks down, you can't just eat the pesky thing can you? Q.E.D.
 

SmallTown

Well-known member
@Andy_W is the man to help on this one as has provided some excellent comparisons for me in the past... Brace yourself though you could be in for a rocky ride
Good advice from @Andy_W as usual. He's really thought about it. I have an EV but am not in a position to advise because I get free charging both in my apartment and at work. So for me running costs are crazy small
 
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SmallTown

Well-known member
Ive got a Tesla that I lease through a work scheme - I save the 40% tax rate on the cost of the lease. Worth doing if you can do it through work.

Regarding cost of running, I live in a flat so only use Tesla Superchargers or other garage forecourt charging - typically will cost me £20 to go from 20%-80%, so half the cost of petrol
I would agree that roughly it’s half the cost of petrol at the moment, maybe a bit more if you are a none member and use ionity or Tesla or if you use instavolt. Also be a bit careful with that though. Constant DC charging isn’t good for the battery. Try and top up from an ac charger at a supermarket or something from time to time
 

Glover_elbow

Well-known member
I would agree that roughly it’s half the cost of petrol at the moment, maybe a bit more if you are a none member and use ionity or Tesla or if you use instavolt. Also be a bit careful with that though. Constant DC charging isn’t good for the battery. Try and top up from an ac charger at a supermarket or something from time to time
Does that matter about the constant DC charging if it's a lease car
 

SmallTown

Well-known member
Does that matter about the constant DC charging if it's a lease car
I guess not for the leasee. But it’s a bit rough on the next guy. Petrol equivalent would be going everywhere at high revs, thrashing the engine and putting strain on the components. I like to look after my cars knowing they’ll be sold on
 

Glover_elbow

Well-known member
Anyone have experiences of the q4 etron or any other recommendations my Mrs is looking to replace her Evoque which is nearly at the end of its lease
 

Andy_W

Well-known member
Anyone have experiences of the q4 etron or any other recommendations my Mrs is looking to replace her Evoque which is nearly at the end of its lease
I had a Merc EQC, which was a similar kind of car, a bit more specced up, it was awesome.

If you don’t go mental on the options/ spec you’ll probably get good value. Think the EQA is fairly similar, I’ve driven one of those as well and there’s not much difference to the EQC and it’s quite a lot cheaper, it came out a while after though. The cabin materials in the EQA were not as top line as the EQC, but still good.

If I was going to get something in that bracket I’d probably go for an I4 mind, as thyre almost as practical as the bigger cars, as they have the big hatch boot, like the old grand coupe used to have.
 

Lefty

Well-known member
I've got a Mokka e.

I have a home charger, do about 15,000 miles a year, about 40/60 urban to dual carriageway split. It's about a third of the petrol cost and worth it for me.

The equation would be different if I was doing less than 12,000 miles, or more motorway miles, didn't have a home charger or was doing more than 150 miles a day regularly.

My dad has carers visit every day. They must rack up the miles, all short urban journeys. I reckon they are in the type of job that would see the biggest saving if they could afford an EV.
 

Glover_elbow

Well-known member
we have a home charger in the garage must have been in 8-or 9 years, It was in before we bought the house, i think they were putting them in for free as an incentive at the time, will it still work with the latest EVs
 

SmallTown

Well-known member
we have a home charger in the garage must have been in 8-or 9 years, It was in before we bought the house, i think they were putting them in for free as an incentive at the time, will it still work with the latest EVs
I'm guessing it's a type 2 cable? If so then yeah it'll still work. Unless you get a leaf
 

RedAsABeetroot

Well-known member
I've got a Mokka e.

I have a home charger, do about 15,000 miles a year, about 40/60 urban to dual carriageway split. It's about a third of the petrol cost and worth it for me.

The equation would be different if I was doing less than 12,000 miles, or more motorway miles, didn't have a home charger or was doing more than 150 miles a day regularly.

My dad has carers visit every day. They must rack up the miles, all short urban journeys. I reckon they are in the type of job that would see the biggest saving if they could afford an EV.
Sadly they are also the people least likely to be able to afford a new EV. I get that there's significant potential savings over a number of years but many people drive cheaper second hand cars. I'm not sure what the market's like for second hand EVs but I'm not sure I'd be tempted at the moment especially when you read comments like the one above about rapid DC charging.
Before I'm labelled as anti-EV, I'm not. If I was getting a company car next month it would be an EV. If I was buying a car I'm not sure what I'd do, but I'm not a fan of leasing at all, so I suspect it may be 60:40 on me not going down the EV route. That said I'm not planning on changing my car for the next few years.
 

SmallTown

Well-known member
Sadly they are also the people least likely to be able to afford a new EV. I get that there's significant potential savings over a number of years but many people drive cheaper second hand cars. I'm not sure what the market's like for second hand EVs but I'm not sure I'd be tempted at the moment especially when you read comments like the one above about rapid DC charging.
Before I'm labelled as anti-EV, I'm not. If I was getting a company car next month it would be an EV. If I was buying a car I'm not sure what I'd do, but I'm not a fan of leasing at all, so I suspect it may be 60:40 on me not going down the EV route. That said I'm not planning on changing my car for the next few years.
Ah I didn't mean to scare you. Yes though DC fast charging does affect the battery more than slow charging, like at home or in a supermarket. As I said through it's no different to buying a used ICE car that's been ragged to within an inch of it's life, that'll wear the engineer out too.

I guess the problem is we just aren't used to EV yet. Most people wouldn't think twice about getting a used ICE car and you jut have to take the risk it hasn't been thrashed. Same as getting a second hand EV and hoping it hasn't had the battery DC charged all the time,
 

S7DiscoDown

Well-known member
Ah I didn't mean to scare you. Yes though DC fast charging does affect the battery more than slow charging, like at home or in a supermarket. As I said through it's no different to buying a used ICE car that's been ragged to within an inch of it's life, that'll wear the engineer out too.

I guess the problem is we just aren't used to EV yet. Most people wouldn't think twice about getting a used ICE car and you jut have to take the risk it hasn't been thrashed. Same as getting a second hand EV and hoping it hasn't had the battery DC charged all the time,
I imagine the majority of ICE cars haven't been thrashed. You buy a average milage and service history 'normal' car and you'll be fine.

I say 'normal' like a family hatch back.

I'll give you that if you buy a Fiesta ST / Golf R / S3 etc then it's a good chance they have been thrashed or modified.
 
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