Coronavirus good news thread

Liamo

Active member
That sounds promising but just to sound a note of caution - this is a breakthrough in laboratory studies only (and is being announced by the CEO of the company). Lots of things have shown efficacy in cell cultures (in vitro) - hydroxychloroquine, for example - that don't work nearly so well, or at all in humans (in vivo).

This still has to be tested in human trials - and according to the San Diego Union Tribune:
If all goes well, Sorrento Therapeutics could begin testing the antibody in clinical trials of severe COVID-19 patients by mid-July.
Antibody shows early promise

So we're still a ways off having real evidence that this works in vivo as opposed to in vitro.
 
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Liamo

Active member
Can someone please tell me wtf this is all about?!?!
I think it's an attempt to link the observed poor outcomes in black communities in some countries to a lack of vitamin D. I'm not sure I've seen evidence to support this however.

The most common possible explanation I've seen is the higher incidence of risky comorbidities like diabetes, hypertension and heart disease in those black communities, linked in turn to socio-economic factors.
 
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borolad259

Administrator
Staff member
I think it's an attempt to link the observed poor outcomes in black communities in some countries to a lack of vitamin D. I'm not sure I've seen evidence to support this however.

The most common possible explanation I've seen is the higher incidence of risky comorbidities like diabetes, hypertension and heart disease in those black communities, linked in turn to socio-economic factors.
There are studies linked in the vit D thread. The findings there have been confirmed/corroborated by more studies this last week, although the high incidence of those comorbidities will clearly have their role, as well as the fact that many work in the health service and may have been exposed to high viral load (ie. affluent consultants as well as cleaners).
 

Liamo

Active member
There are studies linked in the vit D thread. The findings there have been confirmed/corroborated by more studies this last week, although the high incidence of those comorbidities will clearly have their role, as well as the fact that many work in the health service and may have been exposed to high viral load (ie. affluent consultants as well as cleaners).
I agree that studies have shown fairly conclusively that blacks and Hispanics have lower average levels of Vitamin D than whites. What is less clear though, is whether this translates to the same health risks. Several studies I've read, suggest that it doesn't.

Here's an extract from just one:
The researchers looked at data on 6,436 people with an average age of 62 years. They found that while low vitamin D levels were linked to a 26 percent higher risk of heart disease in whites and a 67 percent higher risk in Chinese, the same was not seen in blacks and Hispanics.

“Many studies have been done on vitamin D and its association with cardiovascular disease, but they have mostly been done in whites,” said John Higgins, MD, a cardiologist at the University of Texas Health Science Center in Houston. “The question has been whether we could generalize this to other populations, and the researchers found that it can’t.”
Vitamin D deficiency doesn't affect all races the same

Other studies suggest the same lack of adverse effects from lower levels of Vitamin D in blacks and Hispanics in relation to bone health, for instance.
 

borolad259

Administrator
Staff member
I agree that studies have shown fairly conclusively that blacks and Hispanics have lower average levels of Vitamin D than whites. What is less clear though, is whether this translates to the same health risks. Several studies I've read, suggest that it doesn't.

Here's an extract from just one:


Vitamin D deficiency doesn't affect all races the same

Other studies suggest the same lack of adverse effects from lower levels of Vitamin D in blacks and Hispanics in relation to bone health, for instance.
It is the moderating effect that D3 has on the immune system that was what interesting the scientists presenting the studies in relation to Covid 19. The same conclusions were being drawn from studies in the States, Dublin, the UK and the Philippines. None have got to the bottom of the mechanism yet and, as we've already noted, it's likely to be a complex set of circumstances that are interwoven (ie. old people not only struggle to synthesise D3 but also are less likely to get out in the sun or have a good diet).
 
Another very interesting interview from unherd
Very interesting indeed. Especially the part about other immune mechanisms and the percentage of people at his hospital (and children generally) who have developed antibodies. It could be that assuming (as I have) only those with antibodies have had the virus is off the mark. That would be good news.

He is also right about the fear that has been instilled in some people. I hope that if, as restrictions are eased, cases don't significantly increase we can open up more quickly. Other European countries will be a good guide. A worry would be if we keep restrictions in place when they are no longer needed. It will obviously be politicised sadly (as we are seeing with schools).
 

Liamo

Active member
According to an article on the MedicalXpress website:
A Chinese laboratory has been developing a drug it believes has the power to bring the coronavirus pandemic to a halt.
[...]
A drug being tested by scientists at China's prestigious Peking University could not only shorten the recovery time for those infected, but even offer short-term immunity from the virus, researchers say.
New drug might stop pandemic without vaccine
 

borolad259

Administrator
Staff member
So the first results from the Swedish antibody tests are starting to come in. These are randomise and nationwide with approx 1,200 samples taken per week.
For the week 27/4 to 3/5 Stockholm had the highest antibody count (as you'd expect) of 7.3%. This though is a snapshot of how many people had the disease up to the end of March/beginning of April as it takes 3 to 4 weeks for antibodies to show.
Not sure how accurate this test is, although they did say a couple of weeks ago that it would find all the negatives, but might miss some positives ... due to test sensitivity and low antibodylevels.

Given that the peak of the disease was around April 9th to 16th in Sweden, this must be quite positive news. It would mean that there would be far more people with resistance by now. This is an 8 week survey, so it will be interesting to see how it plays out.
 

bear66

Well-known member
So the first results from the Swedish antibody tests are starting to come in. These are randomise and nationwide with approx 1,200 samples taken per week.
For the week 27/4 to 3/5 Stockholm had the highest antibody count (as you'd expect) of 7.3%. This though is a snapshot of how many people had the disease up to the end of March/beginning of April as it takes 3 to 4 weeks for antibodies to show.
Not sure how accurate this test is, although they did say a couple of weeks ago that it would find all the negatives, but might miss some positives ... due to test sensitivity and low antibodylevels.

Given that the peak of the disease was around April 9th to 16th in Sweden, this must be quite positive news. It would mean that there would be far more people with resistance by now. This is an 8 week survey, so it will be interesting to see how it plays out.
Any link to results? Hopefully we'll start seeing something for the UK soon if we actually buy the US kits mentioned last week.
 
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