Supermarkets - Safety

1finny

Well-known member
#2
The behaviour of some people in supermarkets is pretty poor. Whole families walking around some of our smaller stores just picking up a few bits and pieces - largely to get out of the houseI suspect. Then they home in on checkout operators and have little or no risk to the 2 metre rule.
We’ve gone for max 10 customers in our stores at any one time today (30 for a large store) and given colleagues total control for their own safety.

Couple of points of detail on his well meaning list. According o government - masks and gloves make no/little difference (maybe placebo). Gloves can, apparently, help the virus grow quicker on your hands if you already have it.
More crucially - the virus is most likely to be passed by touching your face with/without gloves. The mask only protects you touching your mouth (eyes and nose are as bad)

You wash your hands prior to leaving the house and wash on your return after you have put everything away. If you have hand sanitiser take it with you and wash your hands on leaving the store.
 
#4
The shop situation is the one that probably needs to be looked at more closely in how we can make things as isolated as possible without leaving people without their essentials, click and collect expansion is one area that seems simple enough and would restrict social interaction but not compromise their requirements. Allocated time slots for shopping, expansion of the customer service kiosks into selling everyday essentials for people that require them to save a journey through the store (bread, milk, etc) registration at a store so you don’t have people shopping in 3 or 4 different places over a week, anything that reduces interaction has to be beneficial to the stopping the spread of this infection.
 
#6
The behaviour of some people in supermarkets is pretty poor. Whole families walking around some of our smaller stores just picking up a few bits and pieces - largely to get out of the houseI suspect. Then they home in on checkout operators and have little or no risk to the 2 metre rule.
We’ve gone for max 10 customers in our stores at any one time today (30 for a large store) and given colleagues total control for their own safety.

Couple of points of detail on his well meaning list. According o government - masks and gloves make no/little difference (maybe placebo). Gloves can, apparently, help the virus grow quicker on your hands if you already have it.
More crucially - the virus is most likely to be passed by touching your face with/without gloves. The mask only protects you touching your mouth (eyes and nose are as bad)

You wash your hands prior to leaving the house and wash on your return after you have put everything away. If you have hand sanitiser take it with you and wash your hands on leaving the store.
the problem with masks is it increases the number of times you touch your face, you end up constantly touching it to adjust it, i believe also that the virus is that small that filtration is difficult, for example masks suitable for asbestos protection will not filter it out, masks are best used by people who have the virus to try to contain it which i imagine is difficult if youre struggling for breath, coughing, have a temperature etc
 
#8
In places like Hong Kong it was more usual to wear a mask if you were unwell rather than if you were trying to avoid getting unwell. The mask will capture the exhaled virus and therefore can reduce the risk of transmission as it catches the water droplets that contain the virus. Wearing a mask when you are well will similarly catch the water droplets and then hold them next to your face...
 

1finny

Well-known member
#9
The shop situation is the one that probably needs to be looked at more closely in how we can make things as isolated as possible without leaving people without their essentials, click and collect expansion is one area that seems simple enough and would restrict social interaction but not compromise their requirements. Allocated time slots for shopping, expansion of the customer service kiosks into selling everyday essentials for people that require them to save a journey through the store (bread, milk, etc) registration at a store so you don’t have people shopping in 3 or 4 different places over a week, anything that reduces interaction has to be beneficial to the stopping the spread of this infection.
‘Essential’ shopping items is an interesting term now. We are in a new world where people are working from home some cooped up with young children. Their version of ‘Essential’ (an Easter egg, some sweets, colouring books, magazines) is contra the the ideas of those working in shops. They are getting really hacked off with what they consider people taking the psis.
The key, of course, is social distancing and proper hygiene - wash, wash, wash.
 
#11
What would help is some more effective ops management imho, allowing people to find what they need quicker. I went in Tesco the other day to get some essentials but had to fight my way through all the Easter eggs to find the actual food.
 
#14
The shop situation is the one that probably needs to be looked at more closely in how we can make things as isolated as possible without leaving people without their essentials, click and collect expansion is one area that seems simple enough and would restrict social interaction but not compromise their requirements. Allocated time slots for shopping, expansion of the customer service kiosks into selling everyday essentials for people that require them to save a journey through the store (bread, milk, etc) registration at a store so you don’t have people shopping in 3 or 4 different places over a week, anything that reduces interaction has to be beneficial to the stopping the spread of this infection.
Think the shops, councils, and government have enough on their plates without having to register shoppers. Just need people to act sensible.

Not been to shop since last Friday so not sure whathey are like now. Have they settled down a bit. Probably venture out once a week for essentials.
 
#18
Once people have been a few times and seen that the shelves are being refilled then hopefully people will stop queuing to be the first ones in on a morning.
I am doing one shop a week with probably one other visit to get milk and bread between for our household.
 
#19
Since last week local chemist had a 1 in shop at any time policy. Trouble was a bunch of older folk congregated around the door making it nigh on impossible to get past them without touching. I asked them to move aside and they seemed aghast that I would make such a request. When I did get in a new older person was dropped off outside and marched straight in disregarding all the notices and the group outside. I explained the situation quickly & saying she had to leave and join the outside people waiting and she started squawking and had to be told the same by the staff. She then shouted something at the staff & marched off to the car waiting across the road.

A great many people have no time for anyone but themselves.
 
#20
i went to morrisons yesterday about 3 oclock and it was almost empty with full shelves, girl on checkout said it had ben really busy earlier with some idiots not accepting the rationing then going to their cars with their shopping then back into the store to fill another trolley, madness
 
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