Shifts certainly get harder as you get older

coluka

Well-known member
Getting harder by the year, a couple of rest days then we go again 👍

Whilst It helps that you enjoy your job, sometimes the will and effort is weak. 👍 Shift work can be tiring, clearly with some unsociable hours, it isn’t for everyone. My very first job involved shift work, working in a factory making mirrors. I had to leave though as I just couldn’t see myself in that kind of work.
 

chickenrunner

Well-known member
My experience in a 24/7 manufacturing operation is that shift lads don't want to come on to days because of shift premium, more time off, short time horizon, etc., etc., ................ Ultimately we ended up with a 2 x 12hr shift operation. 2 day shifts, 2 night shifts then 4 days off and 18 days off every 8 weeks. In an 8 week cycle the production operators spent the first 4 weeks trying to remember how the plant worked and the next 4 weeks dreaming about the 18 days off......... and repeat ad nauseum. :) One of the shift engineers hated it as he said it made him feel like he only worked part-time. :D
 

Erimus74

Well-known member
Whilst It helps that you enjoy your job, sometimes the will and effort is weak. 👍 Shift work can be tiring, clearly with some unsociable hours, it isn’t for everyone. My very first job involved shift work, working in a factory making mirrors. I had to leave though as I just couldn’t see myself in that kind of work.
😉
 

HolgateCorner

Well-known member
I did a three months stint in 1986 doing nightshifts on a refurbishment job at Paddington underground station. Played havoc with me, I ended up sleeping more or less the full period off shift, not eating properly, spent weekends falling asleep during the day and wide awake all night, I wasn’t getting much daylight, I was pleased to get off the job in the end.

Anybody who works shifts has my full respect.
 

Erimus74

Well-known member
I know people in my old job that do 7 nights on 7 nights off all through the year, must knack your body clock.
Nightshift drivers use to come in to where I worked & they'd worked continuous night for 25 years, their shift started at 4 in the afternoon, finishing early in the morning, nightmare
 
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S7DiscoDown

Well-known member
I actually don't mind shift work. I spent many years working 7 days on and 7 days off in 12hr shifts.

I did a week of days 0600-1800 then week off. Then week of nights 1800-0600. The first few days are a bit tiring on nights but you soon get into them. Also on nights a lot less people around so slightly more layed back.

The thought of a week off every other week is class. I have mates who work normal hours of say 0800-1700 often 5 - 6 days. They get one day off😕

I'd rather smash in longer hours to get more time off.
 

Ayresome

Member
Erimus, I am wondering if it is getting harder now you have got your retirement date in mind? I know age could be a factor but how often do you set off to work with the end date countdown on your mind?
Just wondering as I have decided my retirement date and now I cant get the number of pay days left out of my head while each Monday morning seems to get harder.
 

Erimus74

Well-known member
Erimus, I am wondering if it is getting harder now you have got your retirement date in mind? I know age could be a factor but how often do you set off to work with the end date countdown on your mind?
Just wondering as I have decided my retirement date and now I cant get the number of pay days left out of my head while each Monday morning seems to get harder.
Yes I think that's a big factor in it all if I'm honest, it's like you can see it & you're crawling over the line
 

truck

Active member
Yes I think that's a big factor in it all if I'm honest, it's like you can see it & you're crawling over the line
Well I hope you manage to get there, having been made redundant earlier this month (company declined the furlough option) it's not that long ago I thought things were going well (too well) and my pension plans nicely in place to make substantial savings for the next 5 years.
Trying to get a new job and trying to make it the daily job to be active as possible, I could possibly retire but it would impact things a fair bit, an extra 5 years years working and paying the mortgage would be a big help.

never really done shifts for any length of time but do think many do it for the extra cash it provides, not sure how I would manage if suddenly went to working nights. One thing for sure time flies by at a scary rate 2020 which has been a bad year on so many fronts is nearly done, fingers crossed 2021 is better but I do think things might just get worse first.
 

Erimus74

Well-known member
Well I hope you manage to get there, having been made redundant earlier this month (company declined the furlough option) it's not that long ago I thought things were going well (too well) and my pension plans nicely in place to make substantial savings for the next 5 years.
Trying to get a new job and trying to make it the daily job to be active as possible, I could possibly retire but it would impact things a fair bit, an extra 5 years years working and paying the mortgage would be a big help.

never really done shifts for any length of time but do think many do it for the extra cash it provides, not sure how I would manage if suddenly went to working nights. One thing for sure time flies by at a scary rate 2020 which has been a bad year on so many fronts is nearly done, fingers crossed 2021 is better but I do think things might just get worse first.
Sorry to hear that truck,
 

truck

Active member
Thanks Erimus, i know we are of similar age from other postings you have done. Work certainly helped keep me through the covid 19 as was working from home so it was only the wife getting driven carzy as she was furloughed. It is all relative though, I could I think work a plan out with pension funds I have but the extra savings I was planning as other commitments reduced e.g. kids grown up, would have made a big difference.

It is all relative though, as contacted an ex work colleague to ask him to pass on any info on jobs he might hear about, to find out he suffered a massive stroke and currently paralysed down one side. He is in his early 50's and his kids thankfully grown up, but that is a massive life changer. So there are always others worse off, and things to be thankful for, and regards money how much is actually needed to live to a decent standard? Find out tomorrow what the payoff actually comes out as, which will see me OK for a few months in my job search, but have ex colleagues not so fortunate, so not great times at present but there is always tomorrow.
 
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