RISHI SUNAK appointed Chancellor of the Exchequer

atypical_boro

Well-known member
#23
When was the last chancellor to become PM? Major/ Brown. Can’t think of another. Callaghan? The day Sunak becomes PM is the day I run a 4 minute mile in my underpants.
Well this is my point, its 'normally' someone who at least has a stab at it. This may not be the case here given that no one knew who he was six months ago. TBF Major and Brown represent two COE-PM graduates in my lifetime, which is a reasonable strike rate. Admittedly, I'd imagine far more COEs have 'expected' to graduate to PM than has actually happened, and I imagine Sunak is no different.
 

Lottowyn

Active member
#24
I have actually met RS.
However, I see what really counts is what someone tells you about a person in the Guardian et al isn't it ? 🤔
 

Lefty

Well-known member
#30
When was the last chancellor to become PM? Major/ Brown. Can’t think of another. Callaghan? The day Sunak becomes PM is the day I run a 4 minute mile in my underpants.
Yes, Brown and Major went from being Chancellor directly to being PM.

Callaghan was Chancellor and PM but he didn't go there directly, being Chancellor in Wilson's first goverment in the 60's but PM in 76. Callaghan is the only politician to have held all the great offices of state. He went Chancellor, Home Secretary, Foreign Secretary, PM.

Asquith was Chancellor to Campbell-Bannerman then became PM.
Lloyd George was Asquith's Chancellor then became PM.
Bonar Law was Chancellor for Lloyd George until 1919 and became the next PM in 1922
Stanley Baldwin was Bonar Law's Chancellor and then became PM when Bonar Law had to step down through ill health.
Neville Chamberlain went from Chancellor (for the second time) under Baldwin (in his 3rd spell as PM) and was appointed PM when Baldwin stepped down.
Churchill wasn't chancellor before becoming PM but had been in the 1920's for a time.
MacMillan was Chancellor and became PM when Suez brought Eden down.

Given a lot of PM's stick around for several terms and some become PM after being leader of the opposition, I'd say being Chancellor is probably as likely a route as any to becoming PM next. I suspect Osborne would have followed Cameron ahead of May if Brexit hadn't toppled them.
 

Lottowyn

Active member
#34
It seems that not being a Labour Lefty or being a success are quite sufficient to reel in " the usual suspects " these days.
Just imagine if we had a Chancellor appointed who was also a Southampton supporter. 🤤
 

HolgateCorner

Well-known member
#35
He's getting rid of some of the Brexit MPs who helped him to where he is.
I think there is a lot more to Javid going than we know about, there has been an undercurrent for a while. The new bloke is completely inexperienced for the role but he fits the profile, Winchester, Oxford, Stanford Business School and Goldman Sachs. Born to rule the average northern voter in Brexit communities, just give him the job, he doesn’t need to earn it.
 

FabioPorkpie

Well-known member
#38
I have actually met RS.
However, I see what really counts is what someone tells you about a person in the Guardian et al isn't it ? 🤔
now haaaaaaaannnnng on a second..... you right wing nut jobs have been telling us all that the perception of Corbyn/Labour has absolutely nothing to do with the media for I don’t know how long. Conspiracy theory etc etc
Seemingly, when it suits, the media CAN actually influence people. Pfffft. Typical Tory.
 

TheFair86

Well-known member
#39
Is it really too much to ask that the PM and the Chancellor are on the same page? One of the biggest problems of recent years was Hammond being so at odds with May. I'd definitely prefer not to have a yes man and that the chancellor can challenge the PM so I don't think Sunak is a good appointment in that respect.
surely the treasury should be able to say no to the PM If it’s not in the best interests of the country, rather than just being an approved of group of people that will just agree, otherwise might as well just do away with the role of minister and have everything approved out of hand.
 

Lefty

Well-known member
#40
I think there is a lot more to Javid going than we know about, there has been an undercurrent for a while. The new bloke is completely inexperienced for the role but he fits the profile, Winchester, Oxford, Stanford Business School and Goldman Sachs. Born to rule the average northern voter in Brexit communities, just give him the job, he doesn’t need to earn it.
surely the treasury should be able to say no to the PM If it’s not in the best interests of the country, rather than just being an approved of group of people that will just agree, otherwise might as well just do away with the role of minister and have everything approved out of hand.
I seem to remember Gordon Brown blocking Blair from taking us into the euro.
 
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