Old Middlesbrough map 1929.

Redwurzel

Well-known member
#2
Notice an armoured tank near the entrance to Albert Park!

I also found Eve Street where one of grannies was born in 1907. Her mother could not remember the exact day so my granny picked a day in a particular week when she got older. The house was pulled down in the 1960s with the rest of the Cannon Street area

What gets me is our densely the houses are packed in - 95% are terraced without gardens, so you could get 50k people into a small area. It was almost still a New Town in 1929 - most of the houses on the Map were built from 1850 to 1885.

Only one stand at Ayresome Park.
 

buffaloboro

Well-known member
#3
Notice an armoured tank near the entrance to Albert Park!

I also found Eve Street where one of grannies was born in 1907. Her mother could not remember the exact day so my granny picked a day in a particular week when she got older. The house was pulled down in the 1960s with the rest of the Cannon Street area

What gets me is our densely the houses are packed in - 95% are terraced without gardens, so you could get 50k people into a small area. It was almost still a New Town in 1929 - most of the houses on the Map were built from 1850 to 1885.

Only one stand at Ayresome Park.
I think I read that that used to be a great war tank near a park in redcar as well.
It is the park close to the stray cafe I just can't recall the name of the moment. It must have been a thing back then as a memorial?
 

Norman_Conquest

Well-known member
#4
I think I read that that used to be a great war tank near a park in redcar as well.
It is the park close to the stray cafe I just can't recall the name of the moment. It must have been a thing back then as a memorial?
It is called Zetland Park, but I am sure it went under a different name to locals.
 

Redwurzel

Well-known member
#5
I agree the tank would have been a sort of memorial to the dead on the metal plates that line the walls of Albert Park today. Considering the size of the town there are a lot of names on those walls. Before I was old enough to strat school my Granny would take me to the Dorman Museum to see the Lion on the Zebra, the models of warplanes and ships and for her to read the metal memorial plates. She knew some of the names when they were alive and their families. I thought it a bit odd at the time, but now I am older I understand why she did it and what it must have meant to her.
 

sambaDTR

Well-known member
#7
All the Social Clubs and Churches on Southfield Road. The Convent where Abingdon Road School is now. Tramlines down Parliament Road and railway line between Albert Park and Clairville Common. Also love the comment at the bottom on how to convert decimal parts of an acre into Roods and Perches!
 

rob_fmttm

Administrator
#10
Notice an armoured tank near the entrance to Albert Park!

I also found Eve Street where one of grannies was born in 1907. Her mother could not remember the exact day so my granny picked a day in a particular week when she got older. The house was pulled down in the 1960s with the rest of the Cannon Street area

What gets me is our densely the houses are packed in - 95% are terraced without gardens, so you could get 50k people into a small area. It was almost still a New Town in 1929 - most of the houses on the Map were built from 1850 to 1885.

Only one stand at Ayresome Park.
There were two stands. The old South Stand came from the Linthorpe Road Ground and was replaced between the wars by the stand that was used til Ayresome was demolished.
If the map extended it would show the town stretching south of Ayresome and Albert Park's into Linthorpe where there were also large brickworks, particularly Cumberland Rd area.
The second lake in Albert was often called Cannon lake as the Crimea cannon stood there as well as an arch made up of debris from the original medieval Middlesbrough priory cell that had been in St Hildas.
 

fmttmadmin

Administrator
Staff member
#12
Have just checked that map - Cannon Lake was actually behind Dorman Museum that was another lake in Albert Park at one time. North Lake pictured was really close to the old Archery Ground where Boro played their first games. It was quite short lived I think. But there was a good deal of earth moved around and when a team from Tees Archaeology tried to find evidence for the original Sailor's Trod across that part of the park it was buried deep under sediment from the lake. There was no sign of it when the old ground level was reached. Paths and even Roman roads can be really hard to find any trace of. I was digging on a Roman road site once and we knew where it was a hundred meters in both directions but still took many days to find it inbetween despite doing lots of dot to dot exercises on a map.
Interesting to see all the allotments near Longford St/Ayresome Street intersection (Kenyan's Folly) my grandma talked about those allotments and walking through them from her house nearby. So, the terraces at the end of the street were late 1930s as was Ayresome estate. Don Revie grew up in Bell Street behind Archibald School so area around the school would have been a lot different and like the edge of that part of town.
 

Redwurzel

Well-known member
#13
I guess the urinals were often toilets. It does show public health and safety was taken seriously for most people in 1929. The lessons of the early Victorian period had been learnt when chlorea and typhus were big killers. Get 50k people living in a tight space and disease can have a field day. Could also reflect the high number of drinking establishments in the Town.
 

fmttmadmin

Administrator
Staff member
#15
Interesting to see Ayresome Gardens as a cemetery - with lodges and chapel as well.
Does anyone remember walking through there to the match when gravestones were set beside the wall at the side.
A friend called Steve built a scale model of that cemetery with chapel etc and managed to locate some of the graves. Tragically a really surprisingly high percentage were children. Although it was supposed to be closed in Victorian towns by act of Parliament moving cemeteries further out of town, people were still being buried in family plots as late as the post war period, 1960s I believe. Walking across there now, you are walking across a burial ground of a vast number of graves.
 

Borobarmy

Well-known member
#16
All the Social Clubs and Churches on Southfield Road. The Convent where Abingdon Road School is now. Tramlines down Parliament Road and railway line between Albert Park and Clairville Common. Also love the comment at the bottom on how to convert decimal parts of an acre into Roods and Perches!
Need clarification but the rail line along Albert Park was the link one that ran up Cumberland Rd to Linthorpe and once supplied Linthorpe Pottery . Hence Cumberland Rd really wide .
 

Redwurzel

Well-known member
#17
In our family we have a book from the 1960s called History of Middlesbrough I think the author is called Lillie (who was a high up council official). It is hardback with a plain green cover. its a big book with lots of written information on the Town. Not many photos or maps, but it could be a good reference book on the Town. Even now I find it hard to believe how quickly it grew. There must be lots of interesting social history stories buried in time now from the 1850s to 1880s.

Yes I remember the large grave stones propped up against the old cemetary walls - even in the late 1980s. The old Forbes Bakery was rejuvented about 1982 and George the programme dealer moved into a small unit - he didn't like how it was locked at 6pm and so he was shut for night matches. The Linthorpe cemetary is very big and I alway thought it was because there were alot of dead coming out of the workhouse/later General Hospital.
 
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#18
Out of interest after reading the Ayresome Gardens post - how long before Linthorpe Cementry is converted? Is there rules on this kind of thing? I imagine with the way it's changing inside that a gradual conversion has already begun.
 

rob_fmttm

Administrator
#19
Lillie was the head librarian of Middlesbrough.
LILLIE BOOK
Paul Stephenson who sadly died only a couple of weeks ago - published a series of booklets sold through the libraries on areas of the town or topics. eg Linthorpe Road or Sports and Hobbies etc with good sections on Boro and the various grounds. I was once giving a guided tour of Boro grounds and Paul was hiding near the bike and making some extra comments about each venue and then at Ayresome Park he admitted to his identity.
 

rob_fmttm

Administrator
#20
Out of interest after reading the Ayresome Gardens post - how long before Linthorpe Cementry is converted? Is there rules on this kind of thing? I imagine with the way it's changing inside that a gradual conversion has already begun.
Linthorpe Cemetery is set in a lot of space and is still active as a burial ground, sadly a good friend was buried 2 years ago in the Jewish cemetery. It is also a nature reserve and an area of the Victorian cemetery is allowed to be wild. The gravestones and everything else is looked after by the council and the very active FRIENDS group - they periodically run bat nights and wild flower walks etc - as there are wild flowers that date from when one part that was the original village green of Linthorpe (along Burlam Road). Linthorpe used to be centred at the Roman Road/Burlam Rd cross roads.
Some of the Quaker graves are a couple of centuries older than the 19th century cemetery.
The Friends have a goal of telling the stories behind as many people as possible buried in the graveyard. Historian Ian Stubbs gives lots of talks about the many folk from mayors, to shopworkers buried here. Commonwealth armed forces WW1 and WW2 graves are to be found scattered throughout the cemetery.
 
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