If the season is voided how many people would waive a refund?

#1
It is looking very likely that the season will end on weighed points per game.

We are safe on this formula by the absolute skin of our teeth. If the season never halted in dramatic circumstances then I honestly believe that we would have changed our manager and we would have spent money sacking him.

I don’t think it fair on the teams in the bottom three and rather than start another season.

What I do see is a lot of clubs facing administration next season, Middlesbrough Football Club included.

For the reason I think if no more games are going to ahead, season ticket holders should have the option to go towards the youth team.

Sometimes in life you have to take a financial hit.

The club has had no income since March. Maintenance, wages and tax bills to pay.

If somebody is reading this from mfc put this option to the fans.
 

Keelo

Active member
#6
I decided not to go days before they called football off....I would not have gone if it had carried on and although I've paid for next season too I wouldn't have been anywhere near this year. so they can keep my money to put towards whatever...that's just me like
 

indeedido

Active member
#15
I would not expect a refund from the club and would be happy they retain it.
Some recognition of that would be enough for me.
Covid 19 is not their fault and they are precariously positioned as it is anyway.
 
#17
The club must offer a refund or the balance to go towards next season season ticket. People have paid for something and the club is not delivering.
Almost everyone on both boards has complained about the transfer fees paid for poor players and the wages paid. Not offering a refund to offset poor financial management should not be an option.
Fans will then be able to chose to do whatever with the money.
 
#18
Any business can go into administration despite having a billionaire owner, look at Richard Branson and Virgin in Australia for example. Being from Teesside does not make Steve Gibson bulletproof from administration

It is very unlikely that any football club as planed for this. Even Man united have posted losses.

Financially we mfc will have to pay wages,
Maintenance of the stadium, Tax etc.

Do you really want to to a Bolton, for the sake of £90 or so.
 

JM14

Active member
#19
Any business can go into administration despite having a billionaire owner, look at Richard Branson and Virgin in Australia for example. Being from Teesside does not make Steve Gibson bulletproof from administration

It is very unlikely that any football club as planed for this. Even Man united have posted losses.

Financially we mfc will have to pay wages,
Maintenance of the stadium, Tax etc.

Do you really want to to a Bolton, for the sake of £90 or so.
Yes in one of the poorest areas of the country people should let the club keep their £90, owned by a man whos wealth has increased by 60 million in the last 12 months
 
#20
Any business can go into administration despite having a billionaire owner, look at Richard Branson and Virgin in Australia for example. Being from Teesside does not make Steve Gibson bulletproof from administration

It is very unlikely that any football club as planed for this. Even Man united have posted losses.

Financially we mfc will have to pay wages,
Maintenance of the stadium, Tax etc.

Do you really want to to a Bolton, for the sake of £90 or so.

Administration is not something that just happens for no reason. It's not like catching a cold or stubbing your toe. In the majority of cases, especially football clubs, it happens because a major creditor - like a bank or HMRC - is not paid significant chunks of money on the due dates for (usually) some period of time. When the creditor finally loses patience, and has established that there is no prospect of getting money in the near future, it may apply for an order to wind up the company. Or may try to appoint an administrator itself. Usually though, the directors of the company will accept the situation is serious enough not to be able to pay the creditors without help (ie the company is insolvent), and voluntarily put the company into administration.

Administration - like Chapter 11 of the US Bankruptcy Code - gives the company protection from its creditors while it reorganizes its business or finds new investors or seeks a buyer, or any of lots of things it can do to get the business back on an even keel. When it's gone though administration then the company can seek a deal with its creditors, and if agreed, then it continues trading. Or, it may not be able to restructure itself, in which case the administrator will sell what he can, and pay the creditors off according to their status (usually HMRC and banks are preferential creditors).

Now if you apply this to MFC, there's a backstop who will always keep MFC solvent. If MFC was to go phtang, then there would be reputational damage to Steve Gibson and Gibson O'Neil holdings, and no doubt the banks would be wary of dealing with his other companies. If you look in the MFC accounts on Companies House, there is a note that says that GO'N is prepared to support the company through the coming 12 months. While that is in place, there's no question that MFC would be placed in administration.

If Gibson sells MFC then all bets are off. It would be a massive speculative gamble to buy a football club that has hardly ever turned a profit, and has usually turned significant losses. Most speculators would have no qualms about walking away when the going gets tough. With nobody guaranteeing to make good the losses, then administration is only a matter of time.
 
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