Could we see another 1986 with the Boro surge

Erimus74

Well-known member
#1
I dont mean on a negative scale but everyone getting behind the football club, with all the uncertainty & worry during the summer of 86, would we have a football club to support, or not, with a big possibilty that the latter could have been the case the public got behind the team & the transformation was awesome, not saying that maybe the case of us following that successful pattern, but with us being starved of football, clubs in need of revenue, will the public back the Boro, will the club reduce match day pricing, not neccearily buying ST but going to more games, paying at the turnstiles, it will certainly be interesting times when crowds can start going to games
 

Erimus74

Well-known member
#3
I'm not missing football as such, more important things happening but once it resumes then I'll be looking forward to going to games
 

HolgateCorner

Well-known member
#4
I thought the same myself E74, I think there could be a boost as a lot of people get the historical ups and downs of the club in perspective and realise the basic good fortune in having a substantial football club to support and enjoy.
Like 1986 it’s only when something might be taken away from you that you realise it’s full value.
I think you make a good point.
 
#7
"I'm not sure how many really are missing it that much. "
How on earth would you gauge that Corky?

Without talking about Boro specifically, I'm not sure how many people really are missing football generally. This is about the time that the season would normally end. I'm not sure I'd bother watching any games on tv now (especially if I had to pay), and I certainly wouldn't bother to watch a game between two teams with nothing whatsoever to play for. The Prem league title is probably going to be settled after one game. I really don't care which teams are relegated, so if the whole league program is to be completed, by the end to me it'll have all the appeal of a Bargain Hunt from 2013.
 

Erimus74

Well-known member
#8
Without talking about Boro specifically, I'm not sure how many people really are missing football generally. This is about the time that the season would normally end. I'm not sure I'd bother watching any games on tv now (especially if I had to pay), and I certainly wouldn't bother to watch a game between two teams with nothing whatsoever to play for. The Prem league title is probably going to be settled after one game. I really don't care which teams are relegated, so if the whole league program is to be completed, by the end to me it'll have all the appeal of a Bargain Hunt from 2013.
I agree with that, I very rarely watch any other football TBH, if euros 2020 were on i would most likely give it a miss, PL I couldn't give two hits for, Barcelona, Real Madrid, no thanks
But the Boro, as HolgateCorner rightly puts it & then its like its been taken away from us
 

fmttmadmin

Administrator
Staff member
#10
After WWII there were record crowds everywhere, including Boro. It was a real boom time.
But this latest survey of Women Football Fans might be very relevant here where as many as 11% said they would not feel safe coming back to watch football this year even if social distancing, reduced capacities, hand hygiene, face masks etc were all put in place. It will need people to feel safe before returning in big numbers I think. And probably the same can be applied to everything.
Do you think that radical plan for the EFL I have posted might encourage people to return - football would have a regulator, fans would be offered shares and be part of their clubs and it would mean the end for inflated wages and dodgy owners. This is EFL not Premier League.
 
#12
I think what may be pertinent now is that back in 86 the players literally lived among us and you bumped into them left ,right and centre .

Now they’re ‘superstars’ who ( can’t blame em ) are out to make as much as they can and accordingly live a different lifestyle to many of us .

TV is a mega factor now as well , as people can sit at home and pick and choose . They can even watch the Boro live in a pub and if they’re crap just turn round with back to the telly and save their ‘day out’ where year s ago you had to make the trip out home and away to see them . Money too is a mega factor now as it ain’t cheap

Unpleasant but IMHO very real
 

Erimus74

Well-known member
#15
I think what may be pertinent now is that back in 86 the players literally lived among us and you bumped into them left ,right and centre .

Now they’re ‘superstars’ who ( can’t blame em ) are out to make as much as they can and accordingly live a different lifestyle to many of us .

TV is a mega factor now as well , as people can sit at home and pick and choose . They can even watch the Boro live in a pub and if they’re crap just turn round with back to the telly and save their ‘day out’ where year s ago you had to make the trip out home and away to see them . Money too is a mega factor now as it ain’t cheap

Unpleasant but IMHO very real
Yep good point, back then the players & fans were one, 👍
 
#16
Yep good point, back then the players & fans were one, 👍
I remember listening to Wilf Mannion speaking to a group of us at an MSS party at the Swiss Cottage. Must have been circa 1996. He regaled us with stories of how they used to travel down to London by train and one trip they didn’t get a seat and had to sit on their kit bag, chatting to fellow travellers. That was when they were just one of us. In those days they were classed as sportsmen not as entertainers. In fact whilst we all idolised Mannion for what he was he came across as just one of us and was comfortable sat amongst us all evening with his mate Albert.
 

1finny

Well-known member
#17
I think there are comparisons. 86 started off with the most passionate fans engaged.
It will be the same when the return of fans is allowed.
The big question will be how many of the extra fans return.
Performance in the pitch will, as ever, be the key factor.

The similarities with 86 will end there - me thinks.
 
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