Champo salary cap...

Caesium137

Well-known member
#1
Good idea?

Easier to police than FFP?

Championship clubs have been asked to provide indicative votes on radical plans that would transform the way they conduct transfer business and pay players from next season.

Under a series of proposed reforms seen by Sportsmail, the EFL are seeking to gauge support for the introduction of an £18million salary cap, with a spending tax to be imposed on clubs who breach the limit.

That would be shared out among their rivals, which would replace existing profit and sustainability rules. If the proposals developed by the Championship financial control working party gain sufficient support, the EFL will hold a formal vote at the end of the month, with a view to bringing them in before the transfer window and the start of next season.

Key elements include:
  • The introduction of a total squad salary cap of £18m, including all taxes, image rights and bonus fees, but with no limit on individual player salaries.
  • Deductions from the cap to be permitted for the wages of Under 21 players, any income from loan deals and payments received as a result of promotion and/or success in cup competitions.
  • A five per cent 'overrun facility' to be included allowing clubs to breach the cap by a small margin, but with a spending tax to be imposed on those who exceed the buffer. The tax would be on a sliding scale - 50p for every £1 overspend up to £600,000, £1 for every £1 from £600,000-£900,000 and £3 for every £1 over £900,000 - and the money shared equally between Championship clubs complying with the cap.

If the proposals gain sufficient support, the EFL will hold a formal vote at the end of the month
  • Special dispensation for clubs relegated from the Premier League in receipt of parachute payments, who would be permitted to register contracts they committed to prior to relegation at a divisional average wage - proposed at £720,000 a year based on a cap of £18m.
  • Maintaining a squad size of 25, in line with the Premier League, as opposed to Leagues One and Two who are considering a cut to 22 next season, 20 a year later.
The overrun and spending tax would be policed by the EFL, with any breaches referred to an independent disciplinary commission with penalties, including points deductions, at their disposal.

https://www.dailymail.co.uk/sport/f...te-mooted-radical-reforms-transfer-deals.html
 

1finny

Well-known member
#2
In principal looks interesting.
Consequences for failure to adhere to it look very soft - points deduction, if they are serious (as in Saracens - clubs will find a way round it)
I would like to think they have spoken to The Rugby Premiership who have a salary cap - but doubt it.
 

Wilf

Well-known member
#4
will be compliant by the smaller clubs with less cash/benefactor.

the bigger clubs wont be able to play ball with it (& parachute payments skew the market), cos if you dont pay the wages you dont get the better players, unless they are on the way down the leagues, and most prem players dont have to do that anymore, as they are paid the going rates.

of course any club can impose a limit, self policing is always the best way, i would be surprised if any outside the regular top 10 (status) prem clubs dont

be interesting what their PFA say about it, particularly as there are elections due
 

Subbuteo_171

Well-known member
#5
Starter for 10.

The first thing that's needed is the banning of parachute payments.
All player contracts in the top flight need clauses that relegation results in reduction of 90% in salary. If players won't sign on that basis then tough
All player contracts in the second division need clauses that provide for significant pay rises if the club is promoted. This means clubs with a lower budget can still attract decent players if the player thinks they've got a chance of promotion.
Same principles down the leagues.
All clubs in every division can only spend 60% of income on wages.
Sponsorship deals can only account for a certain proportion of revenue - you earn more, you can't spend it on wages for players. Man City a case in point with their deals on the stadium.
Each club must make a profit.
Owners only able to top up a certain proportion decreasing as you go up the leagues.
Independent commission set up to review all commercial deals and agreements for compliance.
All agreements between clubs/holding companies/group companies to be subject to the independent commission.
All agents banned from negotiating with clubs for players football related contracts - this to be done by a select, independent organisation.
Player wants a move, they submit a request via the independent organisation who informs the club. No agitating in the press or getting agents to place stories.
Agents can negotiate non footballing contracts for players, such as sponsorship.
Break the rules - start again in the bottom tier. No exceptions.

The model in the UK is fundamentally flawed.
 

newyddion

Well-known member
#8
Good idea?

Easier to police than FFP?

Championship clubs have been asked to provide indicative votes on radical plans that would transform the way they conduct transfer business and pay players from next season.

Under a series of proposed reforms seen by Sportsmail, the EFL are seeking to gauge support for the introduction of an £18million salary cap, with a spending tax to be imposed on clubs who breach the limit.

That would be shared out among their rivals, which would replace existing profit and sustainability rules. If the proposals developed by the Championship financial control working party gain sufficient support, the EFL will hold a formal vote at the end of the month, with a view to bringing them in before the transfer window and the start of next season.

Key elements include:
  • The introduction of a total squad salary cap of £18m, including all taxes, image rights and bonus fees, but with no limit on individual player salaries.
  • Deductions from the cap to be permitted for the wages of Under 21 players, any income from loan deals and payments received as a result of promotion and/or success in cup competitions.
  • A five per cent 'overrun facility' to be included allowing clubs to breach the cap by a small margin, but with a spending tax to be imposed on those who exceed the buffer. The tax would be on a sliding scale - 50p for every £1 overspend up to £600,000, £1 for every £1 from £600,000-£900,000 and £3 for every £1 over £900,000 - and the money shared equally between Championship clubs complying with the cap.

If the proposals gain sufficient support, the EFL will hold a formal vote at the end of the month
  • Special dispensation for clubs relegated from the Premier League in receipt of parachute payments, who would be permitted to register contracts they committed to prior to relegation at a divisional average wage - proposed at £720,000 a year based on a cap of £18m.
  • Maintaining a squad size of 25, in line with the Premier League, as opposed to Leagues One and Two who are considering a cut to 22 next season, 20 a year later.
The overrun and spending tax would be policed by the EFL, with any breaches referred to an independent disciplinary commission with penalties, including points deductions, at their disposal.

https://www.dailymail.co.uk/sport/f...te-mooted-radical-reforms-transfer-deals.html
I remember Blackpool having a cap on transfers at £500k and £10k a week on wages.. seemed like a good idea at the time.
might just widen the already massive gulf between championship and premiership?

Hopefully they sort out what is going on with Derby and Sheff Wed or else the whole lot will be a bit of a sham.
 

Jonny Ingbar

Well-known member
#9
Given the current rules are effectively means tested, I cant see how a blanket regulation of introducing a salry cap would work.

In effect the richer clubs would be disadvantaged and the smaller clubs exposed to greater risk.

Whatever the rules are they always need to be finessed as time goes by and slubs are ever more creative at getting round them. It would be a better idea to stick with what we have, with some amendments, and actually enforce them properly.
 
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