BBC Chairman fixed it for

atypical_boro

Well-known member
Who the hell is Sam Blyth? And what did he get out of it for doing that?
He's a 'distant cousin' (whatever that really means) who clearly wanted to make sure Boris was PM. Why the BBC Chairman got involved in this though, and didn't disclose it (and expected to get away with it without facing a very strong line of questions about it), is absolutely beyond me.
 

ThePrisoner

Well-known member
He's a 'distant cousin' (whatever that really means) who clearly wanted to make sure Boris was PM. Why the BBC Chairman got involved in this though, and didn't disclose it (and expected to get away with it without facing a very strong line of questions about it), is absolutely beyond me.
It's because they think rules are for the little people.
 

Cardiffdaffs

Well-known member
He's a 'distant cousin' (whatever that really means) who clearly wanted to make sure Boris was PM. Why the BBC Chairman got involved in this though, and didn't disclose it (and expected to get away with it without facing a very strong line of questions about it), is absolutely beyond me.
A distant cousin who suddenly comes to Johnson’s aid from apparent financial hardship. Doesn’t quite ring true unless this Blythe character was a front for somebody else. Somebody else who wanted something. And Johnson could get it for him/her.
 

kuepper

Well-known member
Interesting to note in the BBC Chairman's interview that he and Blythe call the ex PM 'Al' (short for Alexander, his actual first name), and don't use his brand name

I found it incredible he thought it was OK to have dinner with Al at Chequers when he'd submitted his application for the Chairman of the BBC and it was in Johnson's gift to give him the job.

Also incredible that someone with Al's financial problems isn't deemed a security risk and more open to mutual backsratching
 
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FabioPorkpie

Well-known member
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