Redcar Hydrogen Community?

thewanderer

Well-known member
British Gas and other companies are planning green hydrogen plants on Teesside using wind farm generated electricity to separate the water. This has an advantage over other wind farms because they can be run 24 hrs a day regardless of electricity supply.

Carbon capture is also happening. Most of the petrochemical industry on Teesside and Humberside will be included and the carbon stored under a huge sandstone shelf in the North Sea.
But what for? Why not just use the generated electricity to heat your house?
 

Redwurzel

Well-known member
But what for? Why not just use the generated electricity to heat your house?
There seems to be a lot of criticism of current electric heat pumps i.e they need more space, they are very expensive, they don't provide the same level of heat, they still need a back up power source at stretched times.

I know my parents had lovely slim Swedish electric radiators fitted in the mid 1970s, but it cost a fortune to use them. Much more expensive than gas or oil.

I am sure there are posters on here in that industry that can provide more details.
 
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BlindBoyGrunt

Well-known member
But what for? Why not just use the generated electricity to heat your house?
Firstly, wind farms alone are not too reliable. At the moment we only have enough to supplement other forms of generation, meaning that if supply is high the wind farms are turned off. Secondly, relying on wind alone is impossible because on still days we will generate no electricity.

Secondly, we will not only be producing hydrogen to heat our homes. Teesside is becoming the hub of new hydrogen technology, looking at using it to fuel road vehicles, trains and even aircraft and ships. A new research centre is being built over Riverside Park right now. Linked to the University, they will be working on solutions to all of the above.
 

thewanderer

Well-known member
There seems to be a lot of criticism of current electric heat pumps i.e they need more space, they are very expensive, they don't provide the same level of heat, they still need a back up power source at stretched times.

I know my parents had lovely slim Swedish electric radiators fitted in the mid 1970s, but it cost a fortune to use them. Much more expensive than gas or oil.

I am sure they are posters on here in that industry that can provide more details.
Well since hydrogen will have to be made from electricity, it will of course always be more expensive than electricity. If you really insist on not getting a ASHP then an electric boiler or direct electric heating will be your next best option.
 

BlindBoyGrunt

Well-known member
Well since hydrogen will have to be made from electricity, it will of course always be more expensive than electricity. If you really insist on not getting a ASHP then an electric boiler or direct electric heating will be your next best option.
Hydrogen can be stored more efficiently than electricity, which uses batteries made of heavy metals and chemicals, which one day have to be disposed of.
 

Redwurzel

Well-known member
Well since hydrogen will have to be made from electricity, it will of course always be more expensive than electricity. If you really insist on not getting a ASHP then an electric boiler or direct electric heating will be your next best option.
In practice will a large hydrogen producer be paying the same price for electricity as you and me?

By converting solar/wind power to hydrogen is it a way of storing power as an alternative to using massive batteries - I don't know just throwing it into the pot. I assume solar/wind will be our biggest source of electricity in the future so solar/wind is no longer a marginal power source it is now in the UK.
 

Redwurzel

Well-known member
My boiler installer said new Natural Gas boilers are banned from 2040 in the UK. I was a bit shocked when he told me in 2019, but he knows as its his business.

I would guess Redcar has been picked for a trial, because its very near a hydrogen source @ Wilton.
 

zzzzz

Well-known member
Not enough is known about moving high pressure H2 in volume in new or existing pipelines but that's all being ignored because without it the Gas Companies go out of business.
It might be OK but it's racing ahead without the necessary R&D to prove it.

Just take a look..........
 

BlindBoyGrunt

Well-known member
I would guess Redcar has been picked for a trial, because its very near a hydrogen source @ Wilton.
Aye, Teesside produces over 50% of the nation's hydrogen, Most of it is dirty but we must make the effort to realise carbon capture and green hydrogen production in order to wean ourselves off natural gas and whether we like it or not, large companies like Shell and BP have to be involved. In saying that, ending the use of natural gas totally is a long, long way off. There is already a new gas fired power station planned for this area but with built in carbon capture.

It's strange, some people seem to be against the huge conglomerates, against fossil fuel use and against exploring the alternatives.
 
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BlindBoyGrunt

Well-known member
Not enough is known about moving high pressure H2 in volume in new or existing pipelines but that's all being ignored because without it the Gas Companies go out of business.
It might be OK but it's racing ahead without the necessary R&D to prove it.

Just take a look..........
I don't know how you can say that it's being ignored when there is a new research centre being built right next door to TWI who will also be involved in exploring storage solutions. Hydrogen is in some ways safer than propane because it is lighter than air and so that leaks dissipate into the atmosphere. Propane can collect in pockets on the ground.

I'm aware of the Hindenburg disaster but I know that whatever methods we settle on to store and transport hydrogen, it won't be in a balloon.
 

thewanderer

Well-known member
In practice will a large hydrogen producer be paying the same price for electricity as you and me?

By converting solar/wind power to hydrogen is it a way of storing power as an alternative to using massive batteries - I don't know just throwing it into the pot. I assume solar/wind will be our biggest source of electricity in the future so solar/wind is no longer a marginal power source it is now in the UK.
It probably has some use for long duration storage and some industrial processes but that's about it. There will never be a hydrogen grid akin to a gas grid.
 

thewanderer

Well-known member
I don't know how you can say that it's being ignored when there is a new research centre being built right next door to TWI who will also be involved in exploring storage solutions. Hydrogen is in some ways safer than propane because it is lighter than air and so that leaks dissipate into the atmosphere. Propane can collect in pockets on the ground.

I'm aware of the Hindenburg disaster but I know that whatever methods we settle on to store and transport hydrogen, it won't be in a balloon.
Yes but it will leak alot.
 

Redwurzel

Well-known member
Is hydrogen more explosive than natural gas (methane)?

I don't know but I know there are hydrogen cars and they are legal. I signed up to drive one as a trial.
 

BlindBoyGrunt

Well-known member
Yes but it will leak alot.
BP are planning two new hydrogen plants on Teesside, a green one and a blue one. Protium are planning a green hydrogen plant on Wilton Engineering site next door to the Transporter bridge. I'm pretty sure that they will have faith in the storage and transportation solutions which are arrived at. We have to wean ourselves of fossil fuels and we have to find solutions to whatever challenges this throws up.
 

jeff_potato

Well-known member
It's already been trialled with mixed concentrations near where I live.

During the first lockdown there was loads of work going on at a gas terminal near my house. It turned out that they trialled different percentages of hydrogen/natural gas going into the next town over the hill, but didn't publicise it after the public hysteria around covid at the time.
 
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